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St. Marys in Camden County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812

 
 
Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Guderian, November 8, 2008
1. Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812 Marker
Inscription.  In 1795 a cannon battery constructed on the Point Peter peninsula became the southernmost fortification in the First System of U.S. coastal defenses. Vacated in 1802, it was reoccupied and strengthened in 1808 to provide support for the enforcement of the Embargo Act and the prohibition of the international slave trade. In 1812, former Georgia governor George Matthews led the unsanctioned "Patriot" invasion of Spanish Florida from Point Peter. On January 13, 1815, during the War of 1812, a British force overwhelmed 116 U.S. regulars here, destroying the fort and barracks. After the U.S. acquired Florida in 1819, the post was abandoned.
 
Erected 2008 by Georgia Historical Society and National Society U.S. Daughters of 1812, State of Georgia. (Marker Number 20-2.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts or CastlesWar of 1812. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society, and the United States Daughters of 1812, National Society series lists.
 
Location. 30° 45.416′ 
Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 20, 2009
2. Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812 Marker
The marker in January 2009, in the median of Spinaker Drive at the entrance to a new subdivision.
N, 81° 31.005′ W. Marker is in St. Marys, Georgia, in Camden County. Marker is at the intersection of Spinnaker Road and USS Kamehameha Avenue, in the median on Spinnaker Road. The marker is now at the entrance to a new subdivision. Spinnaker Road is the extension of North River Parkway east of North River (and the site of the Georgia Historic Marker "Point Peter"). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Marys GA 31558, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Point Peter (approx. half a mile away); Spanish Occupation of Georgia (approx. 2.8 miles away); City of St. Marys (approx. 2.8 miles away); St. Marys Methodist Church Established 1799-1800 (approx. 2.9 miles away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Washington Pump & Oak (approx. 2.9 miles away); George Washington Oak Tree Site (approx. 2.9 miles away); Clark-Bessant House (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Marys.
 
More about this marker. The marker appears to have been moved from where it may have originally been erected, at Spring House Pavilion, Cumberland Harbor, Spinnaker Road in St. Marys, GA.
 
Additional comments.
1. Marker Location
In January 2009 the Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812 Marker seems to have been moved from its original location. It is now in the median at the entrance to a new subdivision on Spinaker Road. The crossroad is the extension of USS Kamehameha Avenue, which is closed by a fence at the boundary of the Kings Bay Naval Base. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor
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    — Submitted February 9, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 26, 2008, by Gregory Guderian of Belleville, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,086 times since then and 38 times this year. Last updated on February 21, 2009, by Gregory Guderian of Belleville, New Jersey. Photos:   1. submitted on December 26, 2008, by Gregory Guderian of Belleville, New Jersey.   2. submitted on February 9, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Nov. 28, 2020