Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Portola in Plumas County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Pullman Company 8300

Military Troop Sleeping Car

 
 
Pullman Company 8300 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2016
1. Pullman Company 8300 Marker
Inscription.  During World War II, mobilization of fighting troops by rail resulted in huge increases in traffic. Passenger miles would quadruple during 1940-1944, as troops were carried to their embarkation ports for Europe or the Pacific. The basic challenge of moving such numbers was made worse by a lack of equipment and a War Production Board that would not allow the building of new passenger cars. A solution was found when the Pullman Company constructed a total of 2400 troop sleepers for the Defense Plant Corporation between 1943-1945. These were put into service mixed with regular passenger equipment and in solid sets on troop trains until the final soldiers returned. After 1947, the now surplus cars were sold to the railroads and took up new careers rebuilt as baggage and express cars, boxcars, maintenance cars, cabooses and even a few ice reefers.

Pullman 8300 was the first car of the second order built by Pullman. This was the smallest of 3 orders and was a transitional design. Equipped with 30 bunks set in 10 banks 3 high, the car was designed to be comfortable, but basic and thus easy to build. One bunk in each car was dedicated to a Pullman
Pullman Company 8300 • Military Troop Sleeping Car image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2016
2. Pullman Company 8300 • Military Troop Sleeping Car
(marker is mounted underneath window)
porter who rode along with the troops and helped ensure their comfort. Every day, each bunk received fresh sheets and pillowcases in the grand Pullman tradition. The middle and lower bunks converted to daytime seating and each car included four wash basins and two restrooms. Each bunk set included a weapons rack and a place for foot lockers.

An unusual high speed truck (intended for 100 MPH+ running, but with a flawed design prone to "spontaneous disassembly at speed") was used under what was, at heart, a freight car with windows. These "passenger" cars were even built at Pullman's freight car plant in Chicago, further highlighting their hybrid nature. Car 8300 went to the Alaska Railroad after the war, where it was used as a maintenance of way bunk car. Never substantially altered, the 8300 is a fine representative of a unique car type that provided crucial military service on many railroads, including the Western Pacific, during the war.

builder • Pullman Company
built • June, 1943
type • Troop Sleeper
length • 51 feet 8 inches overall
height • 13 feet 2 inches overall
capacity • 30 persons (29 troops / 1 porter)
operating weight • 70,700 lbs
acquisition • donated by Norm Holmes
 
Erected by Western Pacific Railroad Museum.
 
Topics. This historical
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
marker is listed in these topic lists: Railroads & StreetcarsWar, World II.
 
Location. 39° 48.24′ N, 120° 28.544′ W. Marker is in Portola, California, in Plumas County. Marker can be reached from Western Pacific Way Ό mile west of Main Street. Marker is mounted directly on the troop sleeper car, on exhibit in the Western Pacific Railroad Museum yard. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 700 Western Pacific Way, Portola CA 96122, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Western Pacific Railroad History (a few steps from this marker); Railroad Rail (a few steps from this marker); Western Pacific Railroad 6424 (within shouting distance of this marker); Union Pacific Railroad 6946 (within shouting distance of this marker); Western Pacific 106 "Charles O. Sweetwood" (within shouting distance of this marker); Southern Pacific Railroad MW208 (within shouting distance of this marker); Western Pacific Railroad 501 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Western Pacific Railroad 484 (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Portola.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Pullman Troop Sleeper Cars (World War II)
 
Also see . . .
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.

1. Troop Sleeper (Wikipedia). This new rolling stock was either converted from existing boxcars or built from scratch based on Association of American Railroads standard 50'-6" single-sheathed steel boxcar designs, and were constructed entirely out of steel with heavily reinforced ends. The cars were painted the standard Pullman Green and affixed with gold lettering. Loading and unloading of passengers was accomplished via wide doors positioned on each side at the center of the cars with built-in trap doors and steps. (Submitted on December 26, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Troop Sleeper. A cutaway view of a Pullman troop sleeper depicts the car as configured for both nightime sleeping and daytime seating. (Submitted on December 26, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Pullman Troop Sleeper #8300. (Submitted on December 26, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 6, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 25, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 33 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 26, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 7, 2021