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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Wibaux in Wibaux County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Welcome to Dinosaur Country

 
 
Welcome to Dinosaur Country Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 10, 2020
1. Welcome to Dinosaur Country Marker
Captions: (top center) Measuring 5-feet across the T. rex skull pictured is the largest in the world. The specimen is now on display at the Museum of the Rockies at Montana State University.; (bottom center) T. rex and Torosaurs illustration.; (bottom right) Montana Highway Map from 1937.
Inscription.  Montana is famous for its dinosaur fossils. Paleontologists have discovered seventy-five different species of dinosaurs in Montana, more than any other state in America. The oldest dinosaur fossils are found in rocks of the Jurassic Period, which are 155 million years old. They include the gigantic Diplodocus, the plated Stegosaurus, and the fearsome Allosaurus. Most Montana dinosaurs come from the Cretaceous Period rocks, including the "raptor" Deinonychus, made notorious by the 1993 motion picture Jurassic Park, and the burrowing dinosaur Oryctodromeus. About 50-75 million years ago, nesting dinosaurs like Maiasaura and Troodon lived in the coastal plains next to the inland sea. Many millions of years later, Tyrannosaurus rex, vast herds of horned Triceratops and the armored Ankylosaurus all lived in Montana. During the millions of years the dinosaurs ruled this region, the climate and geography were very different from today. Inland bays of the Pacific Ocean during Jurassic times and the Atlantic Ocean during the Cretaceous period provided Montana with a hot and humid
Welcome to Dinosaur Country Marker, second from the right image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 10, 2020
2. Welcome to Dinosaur Country Marker, second from the right
sub tropical climate.
Montana's big sky drew tourists even during the darkest days of the Great Depression in the 1930s. Thousands of people came to Montana to enjoy its wide open spaces and experience its Old West heritage. Good roads and cheap gasoline helped make it possible. The Montana Department of Transportation distributed colorful highway maps and brochures at ports of entry stations and information centers. Beginning in 1935, the MDT installed interpretive markers at roadside picnic areas to tell readers about Montana's exciting history. The signs told stories reminiscent of cowboys spinning yarns to a greenhorn. Over 250 roadside signs still introduce visitors and residents to Montana's history and geology.

(side-bar on right:)
Paleo-Facts:
• American Museum of Natural History paleontologist Barnum Brown discovered the first Tyrannosaurus rex fossil in eastern Montana in 1903. Since then, at least 24 partial Tyrannosaurus skeletons have been discovered in Montana.
• Discovered near Bridger, Montana in 1964, Deinonychus fossils suggested to paleontologists that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded and are the ancestors of today's birds.
• About 65 million years ago, the Western Interior Seaway receded as the Rocky Moutains rose, pushing the shorelines farther east. Great rivers meandered through the
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coastal plain in a warm and humid climate, depositing sediment which would later become known as the Hell Creek Formation. Dinosaur fossils are frequently found in the Hell Creek Formation.

Paleo-Activity:
• Imagine eastern Montana 65 million years ago when it was much different. Instead of heard of cattle, enormous herds of Triceratops and hadrosaurs (sic) roamed the area. Pterosaurs soared across the sky instead of birds. What kind of predators searched for prey in this days?
 
Erected by Montana Department of Transportation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Paleontology.
 
Location. 46° 59.411′ N, 104° 10.75′ W. Marker is in Wibaux, Montana, in Wibaux County. Marker can be reached from 2nd Avenue Northeast, aka Old Highway 10 near Log Cabin Road (County Road 7), on the left when traveling west. The marker is located in the Wibaux Rest Area. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 505 2nd Avenue Northeast, Wibaux MT 59353, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Join the Voyage of Discovery (here, next to this marker); Pierre Wibaux (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Pierre Wibaux (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wibaux House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wibaux Commercial Historic District
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(approx. half a mile away); Clark Hardware Company (approx. half a mile away); Smith Saloon (approx. half a mile away); St. Peter's Catholic Church (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wibaux.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 26, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 26, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 27 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 26, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Mar. 5, 2021