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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Historic African American Cemetery

 
 
The Historic African American Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
1. The Historic African American Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

During San Antonio's segregated era these grounds became designated at the burial place for citizens of African descent. Many important historical figures are interred at this location, including Lafayette Walker a leader during Reconstruction that opposed the "Negro Agent" James Newcomb in seeking rights for African Americans.

Names and accomplishments: Ella Austin established a home for black orphans; Bishop Abraham S. Grant lobbied for segregated schools, and had segregated school named after him; anti-segregationist Harold Tarver, principal of the Dunbar School and an opponent of Bishop Grant; Lynn Eusan, a 1960's human rights activist, and the first black homecoming queen for the University of Houston; leaders of the 1904 "Streetcar Boycott" Jesse Brumbrey, and O.J. Carter, and William L. Hegwood, editor with the San Antonio Inquirer indicted by the "Bureau of Investigation" for allowing articles to be published criticizing the treatment of black soldiers that rebelled against white supremacy in the "Houston Riot", and were subsequently hanged at Ft. Sam Houston.

Author: Mario Marcel Salas
City of San Antonio
The Historic African American Cemetery Marker is located west of the entrance to the cemetery image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
2. The Historic African American Cemetery Marker is located west of the entrance to the cemetery
TIRZ Board 11
District 2 City Councilmember Sheila McNeil, Chair
 
Erected by City of San Antonio.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCemeteries & Burial Sites.
 
Location. 29° 25.106′ N, 98° 27.74′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is on Montana Street 0.1 miles west of South New Braunfels Avenue, on the left when traveling west. The marker is located at the entrance to the Old UBF Cemetery - Household of Ruth Sister Hood. This cemetery is also known as City Cemetery #3. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Antonio TX 78203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hamilton P. Bee (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Salmon "Rip" Ford (about 700 feet away); Adina Emilia de Zavala (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Col. Edward Miles (approx. 0.2 miles away); D.A. (Jack) Harris (approx. 0.3 miles away); A National Cemetery System (approx. 0.3 miles away); San Antonio National Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .
1. Houston Riot of 1917. In their two-hour march on the city, the mutinous Blacks killed fifteen Whites, including four
The entrance to the Old UBF Cemetery from Montana Street image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
3. The entrance to the Old UBF Cemetery from Montana Street
policemen, and seriously wounded twelve others, one of whom, a policeman, subsequently died. Four Black soldiers also died. Two were accidentally shot by their own men, one in camp and the other on San Felipe Street. After they had killed Capt. Joseph Mattes of the Illinois National Guard, obviously mistaking him for a policeman, the Blacks began quarreling over a course of action.  Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 29, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Segregation. Racial attitudes that supported segregation of African Americans probably arrived in Texas during the 1820s in company with the "peculiar institution," slavery. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 29, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 30, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 29, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 29, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 28, 2021