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Washington in Washington County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

18th Century Log Houses

 
 
18th Century Log Houses Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 26, 2020
1. 18th Century Log Houses Marker
Inscription.  The Kennedy Log House, administered by the Washington County Historical Society, is just one example of an 18th century log home. Built in 1848 by Peter Kennedy, the house was originally located at the corner of West Beau and Franklin Streets in Washington. It was relocated to Washington Park in 1936, in an effort to save the structure.

Log houses were the most common form of homes on the Western Frontier in the United States during the late 18th and early '19th centuries. Materials were readily accessible as land was cleared. Log homes were simple four wall structures made of hewn logs joined together at the corners by notching. There are various forms of corner notching ranging from the simple saddle notch to more complex forms like dovetail and square notches. The Kennedy Log House has V notch hewn logs which is one of the most common forms used in Western Pennsylvania.

Chinking and Daubing
Once the logs were notched together at the corners there was still a significant gap, horizontally between the logs on the four sides. To seal in the gaps and weatherproof the cabins, settlers performed a task called

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chinking and daubing. There are three parts to the process: first gaps are filled with rigid pieces like wood or stone, next soft packing is added which is usually moss and clay, and the final step is to trowel in a layer of clay mixed with lime. This final step is known as daubing. The chinking and daubing was the least stable part of cabin construction and it needed to be continuously checked for cracks and the erosion.

Many early log houses were just one-story. These cabins sometimes had second stories added on later in the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century. This is also when many two-story houses were built. Houses were rarely divided into individual rooms and two-story houses often had a simple loft for the second story.
 
Erected by Washington County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Architecture. A significant historical year for this entry is 1848.
 
Location. 40° 10.25′ N, 80° 12.95′ W. Marker is in Washington, Pennsylvania, in Washington County. Marker is on Log Cabin Drive, on the right when traveling north. On the grounds of the Washington Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington PA 15301, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Memorial Trail (here, next to this marker); Pancake (approx. ¾ mile away); Washington

18th Century Log Houses Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 26, 2020
2. 18th Century Log Houses Marker
(approx. 0.8 miles away); 810 East Maiden Street (approx. 0.8 miles away); Community Honor Roll (approx. 0.8 miles away); 96 Lemoyne Avenue (approx. 0.9 miles away); 50 Lemoyne Avenue (approx. one mile away); East Washington World War II Memorial (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Washington.
 
18th Century Log Houses Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 26, 2020
3. 18th Century Log Houses Marker
Kennedy Log Home image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 26, 2020
4. Kennedy Log Home
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 1, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 30, 2020, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 350 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 30, 2020, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 16, 2024