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Algiers in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker

1909-1994 & 1913-1998

 

— Jazz Walk of Fame —

 
Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, November 26, 2020
1. Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker
Panel 1
Inscription.  
Panel 1
Danny Barker and Louise Dupont were married in 1930 and moved to New York. "Blue Lu" Barker spent a decade recording for Decca, Apollo and Capitol, specializing in the blues and saucy songs such as her husband's "Don't You Make Me High" and Here's a Little Girl."

Panel 3
Daniel Moses Barker grew up in the French Quarter as part of the Barbarin clan one of the most illustrious Creole musical dynasties in New Orleans. His maternal grandfather, Isidore Barbarin, was a member of the Onward Brass Band, and his uncles Paul, Louis, and Lucien were all drummers. While still a teenager he organized a spasm band, the Boozan Kings, dropping clarinet lessons to take up ukulele and banjo. As a banjo player he worked with various New Orleans bands in the 1920s. In 1930 the couple moved to New York, where Danny found work with Dave Nelson and Harry White, then with Sidney Bechet, Fess Williams, Albert Nicholas, Jelly Roll Morton, and Henry "Red" Allen. He picked up guitar to attract more big band work, which led to associations with Lucky Millinder (1938), Benny Carter ( 1938-39 ), and Cab Calloway (1939-46). During the New

Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, November 26, 2020
2. Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker
Panel 2
Orleans revival of the 1940s Danny Barker recorded Creole songs like "Eh, la Bas" on Circle with James P, Johnson, Albert Nicholas, and Pops Foster, and made the first recordings of Mardi Gras Indian tunes such as "Indian Red " on his King Zulu label. He continued to work in New York at nightclubs both as a sideman and a leader throughout the 1950s, but the lure of New Orleans became too much to resist. In 1965 he moved back home and took a job as Assistant Curator at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, a position that he held for ten years. The author of two books on jazz, Danny Barker became a spokesman not just for jazz but for the city of New Orleans itself.

Panel 4
After their return to New Orleans, Danny also stayed busy as a musician and Grand Marshall of the Onward Brass Band, which had been recently revived by his uncle Paul. Perhaps his most treasured contribution after returning to New Orleans, however, was his work with children in the Fairview Baptist Church Brass Band during the 1960s and 1970's. Barker found a way to interest kids in the brass band tradition by combining an emphasis on discipline and self-respect with a sense of fun, and the results are evident in a brass band renaissance that is still going strong.
Photo Caption
Images courtesy Hogan Jazz Archive, Tulane University. Exhibit design and Production by Dale Anthony Smith

Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, November 26, 2020
3. Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker
Panel 3

 
Erected by New Orleans Jazz Centennial Celebration.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicEntertainment.
 
Location. 29° 56.986′ N, 90° 3.304′ W. Marker is in Algiers, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker can be reached from Bounty Street near Delaronde Street, on the left. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New Orleans LA 70114, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Louis Armstrong (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Algiers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Louis D. Armstrong (approx. 0.2 miles away); Manetta Residence (approx. ¼ mile away); Marcour Residence (approx. ¼ mile away); Enslaved Africans (approx. ¼ mile away); Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana (approx. ¼ mile away); Algiers Courthouse (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Algiers.
 
More about this marker. Part of the Robert Nims Jazz Walk of Fame. Markers are lamp post shades, located on the Mississippi River Trail, on top of Levee, at northern terminus of Delaronde Street.
 
Also see . . .  Website for the Algiers Jazz Walk of Fame and. (Submitted on January 1, 2021, by Cajun Scrambler of Assumption, Louisiana.)
 
Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, November 26, 2020
4. Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker
Panel 4
Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, November 26, 2020
5. Danny Barker & Louise "Blue Lou" Barker Marker
Jazz Walk of Fame image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, November 26, 2020
6. Jazz Walk of Fame
Jazz Walk of Fame. Markers are glass panels on light posts
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 1, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 1, 2021, by Cajun Scrambler of Assumption, Louisiana. This page has been viewed 40 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 1, 2021, by Cajun Scrambler of Assumption, Louisiana.
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Mar. 8, 2021