Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Charles Blaney Cluskey

What Do We Know About the Architect of These Valuts?

 
 
Charles Blaney Cluskey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, December 29, 2020
1. Charles Blaney Cluskey Marker
Inscription.  
No images of Charles Blaney Cluskey appear to exist. He emigrated from Ireland in 1827 at age 19 and trained with a New York architectural firm for two years before moving to Savannah. He married Johanna Elizabeth Walsh two years later. Starting in the 1830s he designed impressive buildings throughout Georgia [examples below]. Charles returned to Savannah in 1838, becoming active in political, fraternal, and civic organizations. He received City and private contracts, some resulting in legal disputes.

In 1842, Johanna died, leaving their son and five daughters. Charles declared bankruptcy in 1843. In 1845, he was appointed City Surveyor. Disillusioned by the loss of a major contract, Charles moved to Washington, D.C. and lived there from 1847-1871. His renovation designs for the White House, U.S. Capitol, and Patent Building were not used. He died of malaria in 1871, after returning to Georgia to rebuild the St. Simons island lighthouse, destroyed during the Civil War.

"He was employed on some of the most important works in Georgia; he was afterwards Surveyor & Engineer in this City [Washington, D.C.], Engineer of the
Charles Blaney Cluskey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, December 29, 2020
2. Charles Blaney Cluskey Marker
Washington City Canal, Architect employed by the Committee on Public Buildings for the House to make a survey of the Public Buildings in this City. His plan for the Extension of the Capitol was considered the best."
-- Thomas Bartlett, Washington, D.C. 1847, Letter to His Excellency Franklin Pierce, President of the United States.

(captions)
Champion-McAlpin-Fowlkes House, Savannah, Georgia, built 1844.
Lighthouse, St. Simons Island, Georgia, rebuilt 1869-1871.
Governor's Mansion, Milledgeville, Georgia, built 1837.
Sorrel-Weed House, Savannah, Georgia, built 1844.
Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, built 1835.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Architecture.
 
Location. 32° 4.859′ N, 81° 5.436′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on East Upper Factors Walk north of East Bay Street, on the left when traveling west. Marker is located behind the Savannah City Hall, at the first of a series of four arched vaults. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 42 E Upper Factors Walk, Savannah GA 31401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Vaulting Through Time (a few steps from this marker); Chatham Artillery's (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Chatham Artillery's
Interior of the first vault, behind the Charles Blaney Cluskey marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, December 29, 2020
3. Interior of the first vault, behind the Charles Blaney Cluskey marker
(a few steps from this marker); One Building - Many Stories (a few steps from this marker); Savannah City Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); A Storeroom By Any Other Name (within shouting distance of this marker); Central Railroad & Bank Bldg. (within shouting distance of this marker); Birthplace of the University Of Georgia (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
More about this marker. The center of the marker includes the outline of a head, inscribed with: "Augusta, Husband, Businessman, Irishman, Savannah, Architect, Hibernian, Arches, Washington D.C." Below this is the signature of Charles Blaney Cluskey.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 3, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 1, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 1, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 26, 2021