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Moulton in Lavaca County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church

 
 
St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
1. St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Marker
Inscription.  

Following the Civil War and Emancipation, the small but vibrant black population around Moulton began to be served by missionaries of a newly formed offshoot of the Methodist Church called the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. In 1867, Reverend E. Hammitt became the first Black AME minister in the county, riding a large circuit that included Moulton. In 1887, the modern-day city of Moulton was laid out and founded by Samuel and William Moore. At that time, the brothers donated a plot of land to the city’s black population in the southeastern part of Moulton. On this land, the faithful erected a small one-room church. Often referred to as Moore’s chapel by many locals, the little church nourished the religious needs of the black community.

Following the end of World War I, the church became the African American school for the community. More space was needed so, in 1921, the church trustees purchased land and erected a new building for the church and school. Although the space offered few amenities, the congregation flourished here for decades. In 1948, the Moulton Independent School District built a new school for the
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district’s black children. Due to disrepair, hurricane and flood damage, a new church was built in 1962 under the leadership of Rev. W.O. Johnson and Joseph Parker. After several more decades of faithful religious and community service, the migration to urban areas caused the membership of the church to decline. St. Paul’s AME Church reluctantly closed its doors in 2007. Although the church is no longer in operation, its 120 years of service as a spiritual beacon will remain in the hearts of the community.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17498.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & Religion. In addition, it is included in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1867.
 
Location. 29° 34.066′ N, 97° 8.413′ W. Marker is in Moulton, Texas, in Lavaca County. Marker is at the intersection of Farm to Market Road 532 and County Highway 532I, on the right when traveling east on Highway 532. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moulton TX 77975, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Moulton Masonic Lodge (approx. half a mile away); Site of Moore Hotel (approx. half a mile away); Adolph Hofner (approx. half a mile away);
The front of St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
2. The front of St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church
Moulton Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.6 miles away); Old Boehm Store (approx. 0.6 miles away); Orrin L. Winters Cabin (approx. 0.6 miles away); Moulton (approx. 0.7 miles away); Zion Lutheran Church (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moulton.
 
Also see . . .  African Methodist Episcopal Church. The first African Methodist Episcopal Church missionary in Texas, M. M. Clark, arrived in Galveston in 1866, after the surrender of the Confederacy and the end of slavery. Like African Methodist missionaries elsewhere in the former slave states, Clark wanted to organize Black Methodists. Although Texas had had no AME congregations previously, many Black Methodists had worshipped in the Methodist churches of their masters. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The marker and Church are located next to FM 532 highway. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
3. The marker and Church are located next to FM 532 highway.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 8, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 182 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 13, 2024