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Near Moulton in Lavaca County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Moultonís World War II Observation Tower

 
 
Moultonís World War II Observation Tower Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
1. Moultonís World War II Observation Tower Marker
Inscription.  

Prior to the widespread use of radar, elevated observation towers placed along the coastline provided early warning against axis air attack during World War II. Organized in May 1941 by the U.S. Army Air Corps as the Ground Observer Corps (GOC), later the aircraft warning service (AWS), the 14,000-tower system was manned by 1.5 million civilian volunteers.

Located on elevated ground roughly one mile east of Moulton, just north of FM 532, the Moulton observation tower (Military I.D. Number “King 136”) was the only tower this far (approx. 100 miles) inland. The Moulton Lions Club sponsored construction and in August 1942 community volunteer organizations built the tower from surplus lumber and windows. The tower was elevated to a height of about 20 feet with a ramp style staircase to the central “blockhouse,” an enclosed observation room, 12-feet square with windows on all four sides and a wraparound porch, offering a panoramic view of the surrounding countryside and sky. All civilian volunteers traveled to Randolph Field (San Antonio) where they were trained in aircraft identification. Upon graduation each
Moultonís World War II Observation Tower Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
2. Moultonís World War II Observation Tower Marker
received a certificate and lapel pin. Manned during daylight hours starting in September 1942, the tower had aircraft silhouette charts, binoculars, and a telephone directly connected to Randolph Field. When observers sighted aircraft they called in, identified the tower, stated the number seen or heard, and direction flown.

By May 1944 the danger of an Axis invasion or air attack had dissipated and the GOC and AWS were deactivated. Within a few weeks the tower was torn down and sold for scrap. Moultonís observation tower, and the patriotism and sacrifices of the Volunteers who manned it, serve as proud examples of Americaís national home front spirit during the war.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18168.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, World II.
 
Location. 29° 33.975′ N, 97° 7.635′ W. Marker is near Moulton, Texas, in Lavaca County. Marker is on Farm to Market Road 532 0.2 miles east of County Highway 532G, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moulton TX 77975, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church (approx. 0.8 miles away); Site of Moore Hotel (approx. 1.2 miles away); Moulton Masonic Lodge
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(approx. 1.2 miles away); Adolph Hofner (approx. 1.2 miles away); Moulton (approx. 1.3 miles away); Old Boehm Store (approx. 1.3 miles away); Site of the Camp of the Texas Army (approx. 1.3 miles away); Moulton Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moulton.
 
Also see . . .  Observation tower. An†observation tower†is a structure used to view events from a long distance and to create a full 360 degree range of vision to conduct†long distance observations. Observation towers are usually at least 20 metres (66†ft) tall and are made from stone, iron, and wood. Many modern towers are also used as TV towers, restaurants, or churches. The towers first appeared in the ancient world, as long ago as the Babylonian Empire. Source: Wikipedia (Submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 25, 2021