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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

"Garden for Victory!"

 
 
"Garden for Victory!" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 9, 2021
1. "Garden for Victory!" Marker
Inscription.  
This garden is inspired by the victory gardens of World War II.
During America's involvement in World War II (1941-1945), the Victory Garden Program strove to reduce demand for commercially grown vegetables, packaging materials, and transportation needs by encouraging Americans to grow their own produce and preserve and can their surplus harvest. This made more food and materials available for the armed forces and programs that supported America's Allies. By empowering people to grow their own food, victory gardens made Americans feel part of a greater cause.

Victory Gardens by the Numbers

• Roughly one half of all American families had a victory garden during World War II.
• There were at least 20 million victory gardens covering more than 20 million acres of American soil by 1943.
40% of the nation's produce was supplied by victory gardens by 1944.
• American families had grown approximately 8 million tons of food by the time the war ended in 1945.

[Sidebar:]
Visit the Within These Walls
"Garden for Victory!" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 9, 2021
2. "Garden for Victory!" Marker
exhibition on Floor 2 of the National Museum of American History
to explore the story of Mary Scott and her family, who painted a victory garden and preserved vegetables in Ipswich, Massachusetts, during World War II.

 
Erected 2019 by Smithsonian Gardens.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Horticulture & ForestryWar, World II.
 
Location. 38° 53.485′ N, 77° 1.74′ W. Marker is in The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is at the intersection of Constitution Avenue Northwest (U.S. 1/50) and 12th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling east on Constitution Avenue Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1200 Constitution Ave NW, Washington DC 20560, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "Better Food, Better Health and Better Cities" (a few steps from this marker); "Of Course I Can!" (a few steps from this marker); "For Country, for Community!" (within shouting distance of this marker); Developing Sustainable Practices (within shouting distance of this marker); We Need You! (within shouting distance of this marker); Sneezewood (within shouting distance of this marker); Healing (within shouting
Banner on the grounds of the Victory Garden image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 9, 2021
3. Banner on the grounds of the Victory Garden
Victory Garden
This re-creation of a World War II victory garden contains plant varieties that were available in the 1940s.

Victory gardens were vegetable gardens planted during the war to ensure an adequate food supply for civilians and troops.

Designed and maintained by Smithsonian Gardens gardens.si.edu

distance of this marker); Crape myrtle (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
More about this marker.
[Captions:]
Americans first planted victory gardens during America's participation in World War I (1917-1918). This depiction of Liberty sowing seeds comes from a World War I poster.

Diana Hopkins, daughter of presidential advisor Harry Hopkins, tends the victory garden planted by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt on the South Lawn of the White House in 1945.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 9, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 9, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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Mar. 5, 2021