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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Moravia in Lavaca County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

SPJST Moravia Cemetery

 
 
SPJST Moravia Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
1. SPJST Moravia Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

Immigrants from northeastern Moravia (current Czech Republic) settled in the area presently known as Moravia, Texas. Moravia was founded by Jakub Hollub and his son-in-law Ignac (J.E.) Jalufka when they established a store in 1881. They named the community after their homeland of Moravia. A town quickly grew with a blacksmith shop, a gin, a school, store and more. SPJST Lodge No. 23 Nova Morava was established as a charter member of SPJST (Slovanska Podporujici Jednota Statu Texas), a non-denominational Czech fraternal organization, in 1897. The first members of the lodge consisted of immigrant farmers, storekeepers and teachers who met at the Moravia High School. The group built a lodge hall in January 1914 and, in 1922, decided to establish a cemetery. On May 8, 1922, SPJST Lodge No. 23 purchased one and a half acres of land from Frank Blahuta.

The first burial in this historic cemetery is that of Willie Trojcak, who was one-and-a-half when he passed away on September 10, 1923. Several veterans from World War I, World War II and the Persian Gulf War are buried here. The cemetery is bordered by pastures and a fence, and
The entrance to the SPJST Moravia Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
2. The entrance to the SPJST Moravia Cemetery
includes granite and marble headstones oriented in a feet-to-east position with natural vegetation, originally, the cemetery was established as a burial place for members of Lodge No. 23 and their families but now anyone may purchase a lot. Burials include Catholic and Non-Catholic members. SPJST members provided funeral and burial services to its members in the Czech language. The burials here provide a history of SPJST Lodge No. 23 Czech-Moravians and their families.
 
Erected 2010 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16715.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesFraternal or Sororal Organizations.
 
Location. 29° 34.981′ N, 96° 59.124′ W. Marker is near Moravia, Texas, in Lavaca County. Marker is on Farm to Market Road 957 ¾ mile south of County Highway 247, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moulton TX 77975, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of Moravia School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Moravia General Store (approx. half a mile away); Site of Komensky School (approx. 3.7 miles away); Bermuda Valley Farm (approx. 6.9 miles away); Cotton Grove Dance Floor & Store
SPJST Moravia Cemetery and Ascension of our Lord Catholic Church image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 2, 2021
3. SPJST Moravia Cemetery and Ascension of our Lord Catholic Church
(approx. 6.9 miles away); Site of Former Town of Lyons (approx. 7.2 miles away); St. James Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 7.7 miles away); Turner Hall (approx. 7.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moravia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Czechs. Among the first Czechs to arrive in Texas were the writer Carl Postl (Charles Sealsfield), who may have visited the Texas-Louisiana borderland as early as 1823; Frederick Lemský, who arrived in 1836 and played the fife in the Texas band at the battle of San Jacinto; Bohumir Menzl, a Catholic priest who moved to New Braunfels in 1840; and Anthony M. Dignowity. Rev. Josef Arnošt Bergmann, however, can best be described as the "father" of Czech immigration to Texas. Soon after arriving at the Austin County community of Cat Spring, Bergmann began writing to his friends in Europe about the opportunities that awaited future immigrants. His letters stimulated Bohemian and Moravian immigration. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Moravia, TX. Originally settled by Anglo settlers in the 1850s, Czech immigrants started appearing in the early 1870s. The immigrants
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were from NE Moravia and brought their culture and distinctive Czech dialect. Source: TexasEscapes.com (Submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 10, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 9, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 1, 2021