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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kingston in Roane County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Cherokee Cabin

 
 
Cherokee Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, November 7, 2020
1. Cherokee Cabin Marker
Inscription.  
At the time the first Europeans came the Cherokee were a settled, agricultural people. They lived in villages sometimes consisting of thirty to sixty houses, plus a large council house. Homes were usually made by interweaving river cane in a circular framework and plastered with mud. Inn latter periods, log cabins were often built. The large council houses were often located on mounds and also the site of the sacred fire, which the Cherokees had kept burning from time immortal.

Abundant in natural resources, the area provided hundreds of species of plants used for food, medicines, and crafts. A wide variety of trees provided fuel, weaving fibers, trine, medicinal barks and the framework and covering for dwellings. Animals, fish and mussels provided food and clothing.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 35° 51.746′ N, 84° 31.737′ W. Marker is in Kingston, Tennessee, in Roane County. Marker can be reached from South Kentucky Street

Cherokee Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, November 7, 2020
2. Cherokee Cabin
1800 Cherokee Log Home By 1800, log cabins had become the standard Cherokee homes. Most were small one room buildings constructed of round, split, or hewn logs. The average cabin had puncheon floor, board roof, and chimney.
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just north of Shannon Place, on the left when traveling north. Marker is located within Fort Southwest Point. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1226 S Kentucky St, Kingston TN 37763, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Guard Chapel (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Southwest Point (about 500 feet away); Blockhouse #12 (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Southwest Point (about 500 feet away); Fort Privy 12 (about 500 feet away); Soldier’s Barracks w/ Cellar #4 (about 500 feet away); The First Federal Fort in Tennessee (about 600 feet away); Blacksmith Building #7 (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kingston.
 
Cherokee Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, November 7, 2020
3. Cherokee Cabin Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 10, 2021, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 19 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 10, 2021, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 8, 2021