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Brenham in Washington County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Thomas Deye Owings

 
 
Thomas Deye Owings Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 8, 2021
1. Thomas Deye Owings Marker
Inscription.  

Thomas Deye Owings was born to John Cockey and Colegate Dye Owings on March 7, 1776 at Cockeysville, a suburb of Baltimore, Maryland. The family had met with success as colonial tobacco planters and as partners in the Bourbon Iron Furnace in Kentucky. In 1795, Thomas left his wife and young son in Maryland to go to Kentucky with his brother-in-law, Benedict Van Pradelles, and oversee the furnace operations and other landholdings. Circa 1800, after his first wife’s death, Thomas wed Mary Nicholas, daughter of Kentucky governor George Nicholas.

By 1810, Thomas was sole owner of the Bourbon Iron Works and involved in other businesses. To ship his products, he built the “Iron Road” from Owingsville, the Bath County seat he founded, to Lexington. Commissioned a colonel in the War of 1812, he led the 28th U.S. Infantry Regiment. He also supplied cannonballs and grapeshot for U.S. troops at the Battle of New Orleans. His former home in Owingsville is now a Kentucky landmark.

In support of the Texas Revolution, Owings financed several companies of soldiers. Of the men he sent to Texas in early 1836, approximately 80
Thomas Deye Owings Marker and flagpole image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 8, 2021
2. Thomas Deye Owings Marker and flagpole
of them, including his own son Robert, were massacred at Goliad in March of that year. Owings arrived with 1,500 more men the day after Texas won the Battle of San Jacinto.

After the revolution, Owings settled in the Brenham area. He died in October 1853 and was buried beside one of his sons at the Old Masonic Cemetery. His daughter Eliza was later buried here as well. Although he never served as a solder in the revolution, Owings is remembered as a Texas patriot for his support and family sacrifice.
 
Erected 2006 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13589.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesIndustry & CommerceWar of 1812War, Texas Independence.
 
Location. 30° 11.037′ N, 96° 24.096′ W. Marker is in Brenham, Texas, in Washington County. Marker is on Old Masonic Cemetery Road (County Highway 56) 0.1 miles north of Duprie Drive, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brenham TX 77833, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brenham Masonic Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Lest They Be Forgotten (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Brenham Maifest (approx. ¾ mile away); Giddings-Wilkin House
The entrance to the Old Masonic Cemetery and markers image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 8, 2021
3. The entrance to the Old Masonic Cemetery and markers
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Giddings Wilkin House Museum 1843 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Site of Masonic Academy (approx. 0.9 miles away); First Methodist Church (approx. one mile away); First Christian Church of Brenham (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brenham.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 12, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 12, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 25, 2021