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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Casper Army Air Base

 
 
Casper Army Air Base Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2015
1. Casper Army Air Base Marker
Inscription.  The summer of 1942 work was begun on an air base in the Casper area. In four months, four thousand workers constructed two hundred buildings, laid utility lines, built streets and laid out runways heavy enough for the largest military planes. On August 15, 1942, the first plane landed at the base. The official opening was on September 1, 1942. Major James A. Moore, a World War I veteran, was commanding officer. The base was built to handle four thousand military personnel. It became a training area for B-24 Liberators. A massive range was created to the west of the base for bombing practice. The air base was officially designated as the Casper Army Air Base. The base served as a training center until it was closed on March 7, 1945. The field became the Natrona County International Airport. This replaced the first airport, Wardwell Field. Many former base personnel stayed in the Casper area helping the city to prosper in the post-war years.
 
Erected by Natrona County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Air & SpaceWar, World II. A significant historical date for this entry is September 1, 1942.
 
Location.
Markers on the Wyoming History Walk in Centennial Park image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2015
2. Markers on the Wyoming History Walk in Centennial Park
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42° 50.169′ N, 106° 22.349′ W. Marker is in Casper, Wyoming, in Natrona County. Marker can be reached from Fort Caspar Road 0.1 miles west of Wyoming Route 258, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4001 Fort Caspar Road, Casper WY 82604, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civilian Conservation Corps (here, next to this marker); Eadsville (here, next to this marker); Casper - Natrona County - State Founding (a few steps from this marker); Salt Creek Oil Field (a few steps from this marker); Railroads (a few steps from this marker); Ellen L. Watson (“Cattle Kate”) (within shouting distance of this marker); Goose Egg Ranch (within shouting distance of this marker); Ranching in Wyoming (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Casper.
 
More about this marker. This marker is part of the Wyoming history walk in Centennial Park, which is adjacent to the Fort Caspar Museum and shares the parking lot.
 
Also see . . .  Painting Wyoming’s Past: The Casper Army Air Base Servicemen’s Club Murals -- WyoHistory. The great majority of the estimated 16,000 to 20,000 soldiers who trained at the base over the course of the war were not from Wyoming. They trained for a short time, and then many were posted to other bases or sent overseas to fight. This became the driving inspiration behind Tebbetts’ idea for painting a set of murals in the Servicemen’s Club. (Submitted on December 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
About 16,000 soldiers trained in World War II at the Casper Army Air Base. image. Click for full size.
Wyoming State Archives
3. About 16,000 soldiers trained in World War II at the Casper Army Air Base.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 255 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on January 12, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Mar. 9, 2021