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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Sherwood in Calumet County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Lime Kiln Ruins

 
 
Lime Kiln Ruins marker image. Click for full size.
By McGhiever, July 12, 2020
1. Lime Kiln Ruins marker
Inscription.  This was once the site of a thriving lime producing business known as the Western Lime and Cement Company. From beginning to end, production lasted approximately 100 years (1856-1956). All that remains today are the skeletons of the three kilns in front of you.

Niagara Dolostone (limestone) quarried on top of the ledge was maneuvered down treacherous, zigzag trails by horse drawn carts. A pulley system later replaced the horses and made for efficient transportation. The rock was dropped into the tops of the kilns and after "baking", was drawn out as powder from the arched doors at the bottom.

The kilns were heated to a temperature of around 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to turn out a white powdery substance known as "quick lime." Heaps of waste lime are still present on the hill behind you. Wood fueled the kilns until the supply of trees on the ledge was depleted. Coal was later used. Quick lime was barreled and bagged in the Cooper's Shop, the brick structure to your right. Product was then loaded onto barges and railcars for shipment across Wisconsin.

Good quality lime was used in plaster, cement, and for agricultural purposes.

Lime Kiln Ruins with marker just inside fence image. Click for full size.
By McGhiever, July 12, 2020
2. Lime Kiln Ruins with marker just inside fence
Poorer quality rock was sent to the crusher bin to be made into gravel. If you travel east along the Lime Kiln Trail, you can still see the remains of the foundation for the gyrating crusher.

As the quality of available limestone diminished, the liming industry at the High Cliff site began to wane. The last load of stone was dropped into the kilns in the spring of 1956. The land had been previously purchased by the State of Wisconsin and was on its way to becoming a state park.

More information on park history can be found at the park office. On weekends during the summer months, visit the General Store Museum.
 
Erected by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce.
 
Location. 44° 9.616′ N, 88° 17.628′ W. Marker is in Sherwood, Wisconsin, in Calumet County. Marker is on Lime Kiln Trail 0.3 miles south of Lower Cliff Road, on the right when traveling south. Located in High Cliff State Park, a short distance from the parking lot at the end of Lime Kiln Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sherwood WI 54169, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Red Bird (approx. 0.3 miles away); High Cliff Cemetery (approx. 0.8 miles away); Stockbridge Harbor

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(approx. 6.4 miles away); Revolutionary War Veterans (approx. 7˝ miles away); Kimberly Point Park (approx. 7˝ miles away); Civil War Veterans Memorial (approx. 7.6 miles away); The Old Council Tree (approx. 7.6 miles away); Indian Effigy Mounds (approx. 7.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sherwood.
 
More about this marker. Marker is just inside a fenced area around the ruins.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 15, 2021, by McGhiever of St Paul, Minnesota. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 15, 2021, by McGhiever of St Paul, Minnesota. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 26, 2021