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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Ennis in Ellis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Railroads in Ennis

 
 
Railroads in Ennis Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 11, 2021
1. Railroads in Ennis Marker
Inscription.  

The Houston and Texas Central Railroad built tracks through Corsicana en route to Dallas in 1871. In 1872 the town of Ennis was platted along this line on 647 acres selected by Captain W.G. Veale. The town was named for railroad official Colonel Cornelius Ennis.

The Houston and Texas Central (H&TC) began an extension from nearby Garrett to the town of Paris in 1882. Railroad magnate Hetty Green purchased the line in 1892. The line was extended to Ennis in 1894, and the railroad was named the Texas Midland Railroad. As a result of high community involvement, Ennis became a division point. The H&TC established a roundhouse, machine shops and its northern division headquarters here with the agreement that the shops would never be moved while Ennis could supply water for them. Two lakes were built for this purpose in 1891 and 1895.

The Southern Traction Company was chartered on March 12, 1912, and operated an interurban line from Dallas to Corsicana via Ennis beginning October 20, 1913. The interurban line in Ennis ran along McKinney Street, turned onto Baylor Street, continued east one block and then proceeded south on Dallas
Railroads in Ennis Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 11, 2021
2. Railroads in Ennis Marker
Street. In Dallas, the interurban connected to Southern Traction's line to Waco. Southern Traction merged with Texas Traction in 1917.

The interurban railway was abandoned in February 1941. The rail line to Paris was abandoned between Ennis and Kaufman in 1942, and all Texas Midland lines were closed by 1975. At the dawn of the 21st century, the Houston and Texas Central Railroad line that established Ennis was owned and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad.
 
Erected 2000 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 11864.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 32° 19.705′ N, 96° 37.644′ W. Marker is in Ennis, Texas, in Ellis County. Marker is at the intersection of Northwest Main Street and West Knox Street, on the right when traveling north on Northwest Main Street. The marker is located on the southwestern side of Pierce Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ennis TX 75119, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pierce Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Town of Ennis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Southern Pacific Railroad in Ennis (within shouting distance of this marker); Katie Daffan (about 300 feet away, measured in
The view of the Railroads in Ennis Marker from the road image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 11, 2021
3. The view of the Railroads in Ennis Marker from the road
a direct line); Ennis National Bank Building (about 300 feet away); Minnie McDowal (about 500 feet away); LaJuan Schlegel (about 500 feet away); Ennis City Hall (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ennis.
 
Also see . . .  Houston and Texas Central Railway. On September 1, 1856, the company was renamed Houston and Texas Central Railway Company. By April 22, 1861, the railroad was open eighty-one miles to Millican, but the Civil War prevented any additional construction until 1867. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on January 17, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The Ennis Railroad & Cultural Heritage Museum image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 11, 2021
4. The Ennis Railroad & Cultural Heritage Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 17, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 17, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 24, 2021