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Naples in Collier County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Landmark Cypress № 12 — "Baker-Curry"

Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary

 
 
Landmark Cypress № 12 — "Baker-Curry" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, March 4, 2015
1. Landmark Cypress № 12 — "Baker-Curry" Marker
Inscription.  The Baker-Curry tree is named for two individuals whose unlikely partnership saved Corkscrew and established it as an Audubon Sanctuary. It started with passionate citizens who came together to stop the logging of the last remaining old-growth bald cypress forest in the world. These individuals formed the Corkscrew Cypress Rookery Association in 1954 and enlisted John Baker, president of the National Audubon Society, to lead their efforts to stop Lee Tidewater Cypress Company from logging. Baker successfully petitioned the Lee Tidewater president, J. Arthur Curry, extolling the value of the swamp, negotiating its sale, and eventually winning an ally. Curry responded by making a Christmas present of a square mile of the most valuable stretch of old-growth forest. This partnership is a testimony that individuals can make a significant and lasting difference.

With roots anchored deep in the peat, the Baker-Curry tree weathers adversity and continues reaching upward and outward providing value to the surrounding community. Old-growth cypress trees are favorite nesting sites for threatened wood storks. One spring in the early 1900s, ornithologist
Landmark Cypress № 12 — "Baker-Curry" image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, March 4, 2015
2. Landmark Cypress № 12 — "Baker-Curry"
T. Gilbert Pearson estimated the Corkscrew colony contained 100,000 storks. Due to regional development pressures, these numbers have dropped dramatically. So like John Baker, we continue the fight to protect, restore, and steward the legacy of wildlife and wild lands with which we've been entrusted, seeking allies where we can find them.

We urge you to stay connected to special natural areas near your home, get involved, and help with stewardship and advocacy.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsCharity & Public WorkHorticulture & ForestryParks & Recreational Areas. In addition, it is included in the Historic Trees 🌲 series list.
 
Location. 26° 22.601′ N, 81° 36.509′ W. Marker is in Naples, Florida, in Collier County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Sanctuary Road West and Rookery Lane. Marker and subject tree are located along the cypress swamp boardwalk in Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 375 Sanctuary Road West, Naples FL 34120, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Start of a Sanctuary (approx. ¼ mile away); What Makes Corkscrew Swamp Special? (approx. 0.3 miles away); Landmark Cypress № 10 — "Dutcher" (approx. 0.3 miles away);
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Landmark Cypress № 8 — "Asteenahoofa" (approx. 0.3 miles away); Landmark Cypress № 6 — "Guy Bradley" (approx. 0.4 miles away); Landmark Cypress № 7 — "Rhett Green" (approx. 0.4 miles away); Landmark Cypress № 4 — "Roosevelt" (approx. 0.4 miles away); Landmark Cypress № 3 — "Leopold" (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Naples.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary
 
Also see . . .
1. Acquisition and Development of Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, 1952-1967. Baker soon won Currey’s respect and confidence by the manner and spirit with which he presented the case of the conservationists. He made it clear to Currey that he would hope that the company would set a price that it would accept on the land and timber comprising the desired Corkscrew Swamp area; that the National Audubon Society and associated organizations would try to raise the amount. By December, 1954, the money was raised and the Corkscrew Swamp was saved, just in the nick of time. (Submitted on January 19, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. About Corkscrew's Boardwalk. A
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2.25-mile boardwalk meanders through pine flatwood, wet prairie, around a marsh, and finally into the largest old-growth bald cypress forest in North America. These impressive trees, relatives of the redwood, tower 130 feet into the sky and have a girth of 25 feet. Their massive branches are draped with mosses, lichens, bromeliads, and ferns. (Submitted on January 19, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 18, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 19, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Feb. 24, 2021