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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Refugio in Refugio County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Captain Amon B. King and His Men

On this site

 
 
Captain Amon B. King and His Men Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 20, 2021
1. Captain Amon B. King and His Men Marker
Inscription.  

Members of the Texas Revolutionary Army, were shot, after being captured by Mexican troops, on March 16, 1836
 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 2951.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, Texas Independence. In addition, it is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments series list.
 
Location. 28° 18.139′ N, 97° 16.902′ W. Marker is in Refugio, Texas, in Refugio County. Marker is on Santiago Street 0.1 miles west of Elm Street, on the left when traveling west. The marker is located at the entrance to the Mount Calvary Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Refugio TX 78377, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mount Calvary Cemetery (here, next to this marker); King's Men Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); King's Men Buried Here (about 400 feet away); Sally Scull (approx. half a mile away); Empresario James Power
The Captain Amon B. King and His Men Marker is on the left of the two markers image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 20, 2021
2. The Captain Amon B. King and His Men Marker is on the left of the two markers
(approx. half a mile away); Refugio County (approx. half a mile away); Refugio County Courthouse (approx. half a mile away); Colonel A. M. Hobby/Hobby's 8th Texas Infantry Regiment, C.S.A. (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Refugio.
 
Also see . . .
1. Amon Butler King (1807–1836). On the next day the victims again were led out. At a spot on a draw about a mile north of the mission, Captain King and the other prisoners were shot. Their bodies were left unburied on the prairie. Sometime after the battle of San Jacinto a party of Refugio citizens headed by John Hynes gathered the bones and relics of King's men and buried them. The place of sepulture was forgotten until May 9, 1934, when a grave containing sixteen skeletons was discovered by accident in Mount Calvary Catholic Cemetery near Refugio. The bones were identified as those of King's men, and on June 17, 1934, they were reinterred in the cemetery with appropriate religious and military ceremonies. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on January 25, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Battle of Refugio. King and Ward, whose quarrel over rank divided their own small force, refused
Captain Amon B. King and His Men Marker and the cemetery, behind the marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 20, 2021
3. Captain Amon B. King and His Men Marker and the cemetery, behind the marker
to return to Goliad before engaging Mexican troops. This prevented their rejoining Fannin, thereby delaying Fannin's retreat to Victoria—a delay that contributed to his defeat at the Coleto and resulted as well in the Texas misfortune in the battle of Refugio and the execution of King's men. Most historians have judged the entire episode as folly. The clash of stubborn personalities, together with their contempt for the prowess of the Mexican army, reduced Fannin's, Ward's, and King's effectiveness, contributing to their defeat and to the calamity of the Goliad Massacre. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on January 25, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 25, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 25, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 25, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 5, 2021