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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Highland Park in Middlesex County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Invention of the Band-Aid

The Band-Aid Bench

 
 
The Band-Aid Bench image. Click for full size.
By David Weintraub, January 27, 2021
1. The Band-Aid Bench
Inscription.  
1920, to help his wife, Josephine, Highland Park resident Earle Dickson invented the BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages. Sponsored by the Highland Parks Arts Commission Constructed by Lucky Jo Boscarino — 2019
 
Erected 2019.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceScience & Medicine.
 
Location. 40° 29.958′ N, 74° 25.567′ W. Marker is in Highland Park, New Jersey, in Middlesex County. Marker is on South Fourth Avenue south of Raritan Avenue (New Jersey Route 27), on the right when traveling south. Located next to the RiteAid Drug Store. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 30 South Fourth Avenue, Highland Park NJ 08904, Highland Park NJ 08904, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Brunswick (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Raritan River (approx. 0.8 miles away); New Brunswick Inn Site (approx. 0.9 miles away); Route Taken by Washington (approx. 0.9 miles away); Christ Church
The Band-Aid Bench image. Click for full size.
By David Weintraub, January 27, 2021
2. The Band-Aid Bench
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Christ Church Parish (approx. 0.9 miles away); Brigadier General Anthony Walton White grave marker (approx. 0.9 miles away); Queen’s Campus (approx. one mile away).
 
More about this marker. The Dickson house is located on Montgomery Avenue between 3rd and 4th Avenue about two blocks away on the North side of town. A marker in front of the house was removed by the current owners.
 
Regarding Invention of the Band-Aid. Earle Dickson was employed as a cotton buyer for the Johnson & Johnson when he invented the band-aid in 1921 for his wife Josephine Dickson, who was always cutting her fingers in the kitchen while preparing food.

At that time a bandage consisted of separate gauze and adhesive tape that you would cut to size and apply yourself, but Earle Dickson noticed that gauze and adhesive tape she used would soon fall off her active fingers, and he decided to invent something that would stay in place and protect small wounds better.

Earle Dickson took a piece of gauze and attached it to the center of a piece of tape then covered the product with crinoline to keep it sterile. This ready-to-go product allowed his wife to dress her wounds without assistance, and when Earle's boss James Johnson saw the invention, he decided to manufacture band-aids to the public and make Earle Dickson vice-president of the company.
 
Also see . . .  The History of the Band-Aid (ThoughtCo). (Submitted on January 30, 2021, by David Weintraub of Edison, New Jersey.)
The Band-Aid Bench image. Click for full size.
By David Weintraub, January 27, 2021
3. The Band-Aid Bench
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 30, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 27, 2021, by David Weintraub of Edison, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 27, 2021, by David Weintraub of Edison, New Jersey. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 4, 2021