Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Stony Point in Rockland County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Crucial Crossing

 
 
A Crucial Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, November 7, 2019
1. A Crucial Crossing Marker
Text of the main illustration:
Rochambeau’s French Army departing Verplanck to cross the Hudson River. Notice a common and efficient practice of transporting cattle across the river. They swim!
Inscription.  Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail

During the American Revolution, King’s Ferry was the most secure Hudson River crossing north of British-held New York City. It was the key connecting New England with the rest of the thirteen states. From August 2-25, 1781, 1,200 American troops under Washington and approximately 4,500 French troops under Rochambeau crossed from Verplanck and landed on the shore below you on their way to Yorktown, Virginia.

Heavy artillery and provisions wagons (including travelling forges, ammunition chests, and officers’ baggage) crossed on the ferry boats and barges the army used during the war years. Oxen and horses pulled these wagon trains south from the ferry landing along roadways and made their way to the Ramapo Pass. Soldiers walked great distances and often carried heavy loads.

When French forces made their return trip to New England following the allied victory at Yorktown, they again crossed at King’s Ferry in mid-September of 1782. The ferry continued to operate through the early 20th century.

[upper left caption; map view to top is
A Crucial Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, November 7, 2019
2. A Crucial Crossing Marker
Two other NPS waysides share the site.
to south
]
This 1781 French-illustrated map shows the strategic 1/2-mile crossing from Verplanck to Stony Point at King’s Ferry.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #01 George Washington, and the The Washington-Rochambeau Route series lists.
 
Location. 41° 14.57′ N, 73° 58.529′ W. Marker is in Stony Point, New York, in Rockland County. Marker can be reached from Battlefield Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Site, Stony Point NY 10980, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Path to Victory (here, next to this marker); Intrigue at King’s Ferry (here, next to this marker); Fraser’s Highlanders (within shouting distance of this marker); British Defenses: The Outer Works (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The British Occupy Stony Point (about 500 feet away); 17th British Regiment of Foot (about 500 feet away); The American Strategy (about 500 feet away); Stony Point Battlefield (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stony Point.
 
Regarding A Crucial Crossing.
A Crucial Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, November 7, 2019
3. A Crucial Crossing Marker
The three NPS waysides overlook this narrowing of the Hudson River and the strategic crossing.
One of three wayside markers belonging to the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail series. They replace an earlier site-specific battlefield marker.
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, November 7, 2019
4. Inset
This 1781 French-illustrated map shows the strategic ½-mile crossing from Verplanck to Stony Point at King’s Ferry.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 97 times since then and 12 times this year. Last updated on January 27, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 5, 2021