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Portsmouth in Scioto County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Stagecoach / Hanging Rock Region / Ohio and Erie Canal / Early Industries

Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art

 
 
Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, January 7, 2021
1. Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker
Inscription.  
Stagecoach
Prior to the advent of railroads, Portsmouth was a hub for stagecoach transportation, maintaining regular schedules to various surrounding towns. In 1830, a trip on the Portsmouth and Columbus turnpike took 18 hours in good weather and cost about $5. A resident could also board the Ohio River ferry and catch a stagecoach from South Shore. Kentucky to most cities in the Bluegrass state. During the first half of the century, stagecoaches carried most of the mail and packages. An estimated 50 coach houses (stops) were scattered throughout the county. The group shown in the mural is en route to Glen Springs. Kentucky for an outing.

Hanging Rock Region
The discovery of a rich vein of iron ore extending from Jackson, Ohio south to the Ironton, Hanging Rock, and northern Kentucky areas gave birth to iron furnaces that dotted the countryside in the 1800's similar to the one shown here. Iron ore, limestone, and charcoal were charged in top of the furnace and heated to smelt out the liquid iron which flowed from the bottom of the furnace into sand troughs to solidify into pig iron.
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The pig iron produced in these furnaces was transported to the Gaylord Rolling Mill (near the Ohio River) and the Scioto Rolling Mill (Third and Madison Streets) in Portsmouth, as well as many plants in the east.

Ohio and Erie Canal
This mural shows a section of the Ohio and Erie Canal as it progressed northward from Portsmouth. Portsmouth was the southern terminus of the canal, which connected Lake Erie to the Ohio River. Construction of the canal began in the summer of 1825 and was completed in 1832. The canal covered the distance of 306 miles. Just to the right of the center portion of the mural is a covered bridge crossing Scioto Bush Creek and immediately adjacent to an aqueduct which conveyed the canal across the creek. Alongside the main picture are sketches of the terminus at Portsmouth and a map showing the route of the canal from Portsmouth to Cleveland.

Early Industries
Early settlers took advantage of two important natural resources that were prevalent in Southern Ohio: clay and stone. This mural depicts a quarry (left), where slabs of stone were cut from the earth, shipped to stone mills, and custom cut for numerous projects, including homes, building facades, and fireplace mantles. To the right is a brick plant that produced bricks for lining iron and steel making furnaces, and bricks that were used for
Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, January 7, 2021
2. Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker
pavement. Most of Portsmouth's early streets were paved with bricks. A few have survived the years and remain brick covered today. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Ohio and Erie Canal, and the Ohio, Portsmouth, Floodwall Murals series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1830.
 
Location. 38° 43.846′ N, 83° 0.102′ W. Marker is in Portsmouth, Ohio, in Scioto County. Marker is on Front Street just west of Court Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 531 Front St, Portsmouth OH 45662, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Platting of Portsmouth, 1803 / The 1810 House / The 1812 Era / Flood Gate House / Early Boneyfiddle (within shouting distance of this marker); Portsmouth and the Ohio River (within shouting distance of this marker); Tenth Street Station / Market Square / Portsmouth 1903 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Introduction / The Mound Builders / Early Shawnee Village, 1730 / Celeron de Blainville, 1749 (about 300 feet away); Alexandria / Alexandria Flood / Stone House / Court Street Gateway (about
Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, January 7, 2021
3. Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker
400 feet away); 1937 Ohio River Flood Mark on Bigg's House (about 400 feet away); Flood of 1937 (about 500 feet away); Millbrook Park / The Shoe Industry, 1869-1977 / Early 1900's Streetcar / Government Square, 1919 (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Portsmouth.
 
Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, January 7, 2021
4. Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker
Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, January 7, 2021
5. Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker
Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, January 7, 2021
6. Floodwall Murals, 2000 Feet of History/2000 Feet of Art Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 5, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 4, 2021, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 264 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 4, 2021, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 14, 2024