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Buckeye Furnace in Jackson County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge

 
 
Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, October 23, 2020
1. Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker
Inscription.  
The covered bridge era in America was from the nineteenth century. The last covered bridge of this period was built by the State of Ohio in Vinton County in 1919, Bridges were enclosed to protect the wooden structural parts and decks from rain and snow and to prevent decay. Uncovered bridges would last about ten years, while covered bridges could last centuries.

Built in 1872, the Buckeye Furnace Bridge is historically important because it represents a truss built following the designs of one of Ohio's premier bridge builders, the Smith Bridge Company, which was among the first in the nation to make covered bridges an industrial product. This bridge was actually built by Dency, McCurdy, and Company, a local firm that purchased the rights to use Smith's design. The bridge is 68.5 feet long and 16 feet wide, with a 58.5 feet clear span.

This bridge used the Smith Truss plan, which was first patented in 1867 by Robert W. Smith of Tipp City (originally Tippecanoe), and later Toledo, Ohio. Smith would prefabricate a bridge in Toledo and ship the components to the erection site, or he would sell the parts to another builder-as

Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, October 23, 2020
2. Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker
was done in this case-or he would sell the plans to another builder or local official.

At the beginning of the twentieth-first century, the covered bridge needed to be replaced with a modern span because of increased traffic and overloading. The Jackson County Engineer and the Ohio Historical Society moved the covered bridge adjacent to its original location.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Bridges & ViaductsIndustry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the Appalachian Iron Furnaces, and the Covered Bridges 🌉 series lists.
 
Location. 39° 3.249′ N, 82° 27.43′ W. Marker is in Buckeye Furnace, Ohio, in Jackson County. Marker is on Buckeye Road (County Road 165) 0.1 miles east of Buckeye Park Road (County Road 167), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 316 Buckeye Rd, Wellston OH 45692, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Scales (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Furnace Communities (about 400 feet away); Buckeye Furnace (1851 - 1894) (about 500 feet away); Hanging Rock Region (about 500 feet away); Civil War (about 500 feet away); Raw Materials (about 700 feet away); Limestone (about 700 feet away); Charcoal (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buckeye Furnace.
 
Also see . . .

Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, October 23, 2020
3. Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker
 Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge. (Submitted on February 10, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio.)
 
Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, October 23, 2020
4. Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker
Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, October 23, 2020
5. Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker
Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, October 23, 2020
6. Buckeye Furnace Covered Bridge Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 10, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 10, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 2, 2021