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Lubbock in Lubbock County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Texas Tech University Dairy Barn

 
 
Texas Tech University Dairy Barn Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen Lowrey, March 10, 2021
1. Texas Tech University Dairy Barn Marker
Inscription.  

The dairy barn at Texas Tech University was completed in 1927 and was built to house the cows used by the Animal Husbandry Department. The barn and adjacent silo were designed by the architectural and engineering firm of Sanguinet, Staats & Hedrick. Principal architect Wyatt Hedrick designed an Arts and Crafts bungalow barn, a style that differed from the central campus Spanish Renaissance Revival architecture. Two agricultural instructors, Dr. A.H. Leidigh and W.L. Stangel, were instrumental in the planning stages, suggesting that the barn should appeal to the sensibilities of farmers. The El Paso firm of Ramey Bros. was awarded the contract in July 1925 to build the dairy barn complex.

The barn closely followed standard dairy farming configuration and was constructed with hollow-tile walls plastered with gray stucco, wood windows, doors and exposed rafter ends. The free-standing silo was constructed from cast concrete and features a conical roof. The plans for the two-wing barn included a milk house, sun room, milking and feeding room, calf stalls, boiler room, feed mixing room and an office.

By 1930, the dairy produced

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enough milk, butter and ice cream for the college cafeteria and private customers. Students who kept their cows at the dairy reduced their tuition through the sale of the dairy’s products. The barn was damaged in a fire on January 29, 1930, but was repaired and remained in use until 1966 when the Dairy Manufacturing Department vacated the building. Soon after, the milk house and sun room wings were demolished to make way for the Foreign Language Building.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark – 2015
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18313.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureEducation. A significant historical date for this entry is January 29, 1930.
 
Location. 33° 34.888′ N, 101° 52.678′ W. Marker is in Lubbock, Texas, in Lubbock County. Marker can be reached from Detroit Avenue, 0.1 miles south of 15th Street. The marker is 375 feet south of the intersection of 15th and Detroit on the Texas Tech Campus. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lubbock TX 79409, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Texas Tech Dairy Barn (here, next to this marker); Texas Tech Judging Pavilion (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Texas Tech Alumni Association (approx. 0.4 miles away); St. John's United Methodist Church
Texas Tech University Dairy Barn Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen Lowrey, March 10, 2021
2. Texas Tech University Dairy Barn Marker
An additional marker and National Register of Historic Places Marker can be seen further to the right attached to the barn.
(approx. half a mile away); Bairfield Schoolhouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); Locomotive (approx. 0.6 miles away); Barton House (approx. 0.6 miles away); "80" John House (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lubbock.
 
Texas Tech University Dairy Barn and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen Lowrey, March 10, 2021
3. Texas Tech University Dairy Barn and Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 14, 2021, by Allen Lowrey of Amarillo, Texas. This page has been viewed 195 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 14, 2021, by Allen Lowrey of Amarillo, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 24, 2024