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Nacogdoches in Nacogdoches County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches

 
 
The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
1. The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches Marker
Inscription.  Throughout the storied history of Nacogdoches, nine different flags have flown over the region. The six flags of Texas are well known, but three others have also been raised. The traditional six flags include those for Spain (1519 – 1685; 1690 – 1821), France (1685 – 1690), Mexico (1821 – 1836), the Republic of Texas (1836 – 1845), the United States of America (1845 – 1861; 1865 – present) and the Confederate States of America (1861 – 1865).

The earliest of the other flags was an emerald banner for the Gutiérrez-Magee Expedition (1812 – 1813). Lt. Augustus Magee and Col. Bernardo Gutiérrez organized an army which controlled territory east of San Antonio. However, Gutiérrez lost support, a Mexican force regained San Antonio, and the army disbanded. Another flag contained red and white stripes with one white star on a red field, representing the Long Republic (1819). Col. James Long set up a government from Nacogdoches, which fell to Spanish forces; he was later captured and killed. The final of the three flags was red and white, and inscribed with the words, “Independence,
The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
2. The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches Marker
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Freedom and Justice.” It belonged to the Republic of Fredonia (1826 – 1827). Empresario Haden H. Edwards proclaimed a new republic following the Mexican revocation of his colonial charter. When he failed to enlist aid, Edwards fled, ending the rebellion.

Nacogdoches has been a gateway to Texas for hundreds of years, not only for settlers but also for ideals. The nine flags of Nacogdoches represent revolutionary activity that was essential to the spirit of Texas. In 1997, residents began celebrating the Nine Flags Festival, which commemorates the city’s importance as a center of freedom and a community vital to Texas history.
 
Erected 2008 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 14312.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Government & Politics.
 
Location. 31° 36.183′ N, 94° 39.305′ W. Marker is in Nacogdoches, Texas, in Nacogdoches County. Marker is at the intersection of East Main Street (State Highway 21) and South Pecan Street, on the right when traveling east on East Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 East Main Street, Nacogdoches TX 75961, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nacogdoches Federal Building / Post Office (here, next to this marker); Battle of Nacogdoches (within shouting distance
The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
3. The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches
The Nine Flags of Nacogdoches are flown above City Hall.
of this marker); The Fredonia Rebellion (within shouting distance of this marker); Ingraham Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Sam Houston's First Home in Texas (within shouting distance of this marker); Gladys Hampton Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of First Home in Texas Owned by General Sam Houston (within shouting distance of this marker); Homesite of John S. Roberts (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nacogdoches.
 
Also see . . .  Nine Flags History. Nacogdoches Convention and Visitors Bureau (Submitted on April 13, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 13, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 13, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 32 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 13, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.

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May. 11, 2021