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Resaca in Gordon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Picturing a 19th-century Battle

 
 
Picturing a 19th-century Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
1. Picturing a 19th-century Battle Marker
Inscription.  A French scientist invented photography in 1832. By 1861, the beginning of the Civil War, photography had progressed a great deal. However, photographers still created images mostly on glass (daguerreotype) or tin (tintype). Each image took a long time to expose. The first paper prints (carte de viste) became popular in the mid 1850s, but even those required several minutes of a very still pose. Can you imagine a battle stopping for 3 to 15 minutes for a photograph to be taken? How could everyone and everything hold still for that long?

So how did newspapers get images of battles? Well, they used artists who drew the battle from an observation point, making rough drafts during the battle and then filling in the details later from memory. “Harper's Weekly” and “Frank Leslie's illustrated” newspapers employed several artists who traveled with the Union Army. The South had no artists traveling with their armies.

Captions:
Top left: The Waud brothers worked as artists for “Harper's Weekly,” the most widely read newspaper in the North. Alfred drew the sketch above of the Battle
Picturing a 19th-century Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 11, 2021
2. Picturing a 19th-century Battle Marker
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of Resaca. William probably drew the sketch to the right of the Battle of Lay's Ferry, which occurred just south of here at the same time as the Resaca.
Bottom left: The artists would complete their sketches after the battle and send them by messenger back to New York City. Next, engravers would create brass plate engravings of the sketches that could be reproduced in newspapers. All of this took from several weeks to a month! The engraving on the left is the published image from Alfred Waud's sketch of the Battle of Resaca shown above.
Right: Traveling photographers like the one shown above often photographed a battlefield after the battle was over and both armies had moved on. Notice how the photographer on the far right is blurry — he moved while the photograph was being exposed. Below is a photograph of Resaca battlefield after the battle.
 
Erected by Georgia Department of Natural Resources - State Parks and Historic Sites.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicCommunicationsWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 35.73′ N, 84° 57.724′ W. Marker is in Resaca, Georgia, in Gordon County. Marker can be reached from Resaca Lafayette Road Northwest (Georgia Route
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136). Marker is on the circular trail near the pavilion at the end of Resaca Battlefield State Historic Site's entrance road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6 GA-136, Resaca GA 30735, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Action — Judah's Division (here, next to this marker); Did You Know That Both Sides Used Red, White and Blue Flags? (a few steps from this marker); Stories from the Wild Hills of Resaca (within shouting distance of this marker); Enduring the Battle of Resaca (within shouting distance of this marker); Resaca Battlefield State Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Action — Carlin's Brigade (approx. ¼ mile away); How to Tell the Yankees from the Rebels! (approx. ¼ mile away); Resaca's Confederate Cemetery / Resaca's Fort Wayne (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Resaca.
 
Also see . . .
1. Alfred Waud (Wikipedia). (Submitted on April 14, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.)
2. William Waud (Wikipedia). (Submitted on April 14, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 14, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 14, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 14, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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May. 11, 2021