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Roanoke, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Norfolk & Western ALCO C630 Diesel-Electric #1135

 
 
Norfolk & Western ALCO C630 Diesel-Electric #1135 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 24, 2021
1. Norfolk & Western ALCO C630 Diesel-Electric #1135 Marker
Inscription.  
Manufacturer: American Locomotive Company (ALCO), 1967
Weight: 204 tons
Length: 69 feet
Height: 15 feet 7 inches
Fuel capacity: 4,000 gallons
Engine: 16 cylinder, model 251E
Horsepower: 3,000
Wheel diameter: 40 inches
Tractive effort: 90,600 pounds
Maximum speed: 70 miles per hour (mph)

ALCO developed the C630s in response to General Motors' SD-40 locomotive. One of 10 purchased by Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railway in 1966-1967, the C630 1135 was originally used in regular freight service. These locomotives were the only ones of the 77 that American Locomotive Company (ALCO) produced between 1965-1967 that were designed with high, short hoods.

In the 1970s, these units were coupled to slugs (unpowered rail) equipment that help increase a locomotive's traction) and used in hump yard service at Virginia N&W yards in Portsmouth, Bluefield, Roanoke & Norfolk.

This locomotive is painted in "Pevler Blue," a color named for N&W President Herman Pevler who served from 1963-1970. During Pevler's

Norfolk & Western ALCO C630 Diesel-Electric #1135 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 24, 2021
2. Norfolk & Western ALCO C630 Diesel-Electric #1135 Marker
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administration, black N&W engines were repainted in a blue similar to what was used on the Wabash. Pevler had previously been the president of the Wabash Railroad; Wabash was leased by N&W in 1964.

The most distinctive feature of the C630 is its large aftercooler radiator housing above the roofline. The aftercooler radiators boost performance when the locomotive is operating under a heavy load.

Due to the high maintenance costs for these engines, N&W unsuccessfully attempted to sell them to the Chicago and Northwestern Transportation Company. Instead, N&W converted them to hump yard slug masters. They were assigned to service in the Virginia cities of Bluefield, Roanoke, and Lamberts Point, as well as Portsmouth, Ohio. There are four C630s still in existence.
 
Erected by Virginia Museum of Transportation, Inc.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars. A significant historical year for this entry is 1967.
 
Location. 37° 16.398′ N, 79° 56.8′ W. Marker is in Roanoke, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Norfolk Avenue Southwest and 3rd Street Southwest, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 303 Norfolk Ave SW, Roanoke VA 24016, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Norfolk Southern Research Car #31 (here, next to this marker); Trailer Train Flatcar #470534 and Sea-Land Containers

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(here, next to this marker); Norfolk & Western EMD SD45 #1776 (a few steps from this marker); Depressed Center Flatcar APWX #1002 (a few steps from this marker); Amoco Oil ARA III Tank Car AMOX #9465 (a few steps from this marker); Virginia Central Porter Rod Driven Locomotive #3 (a few steps from this marker); Whitcomb 30DM31 Diesel Switcher (a few steps from this marker); Chesapeake Western DS-4-4-660 #662 (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Roanoke.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 30, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 30, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 30, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 11, 2021