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Roanoke, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Norfolk & Western Class G1 #6

 
 
Norfolk & Western Class G1 #6 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 24, 2021
1. Norfolk & Western Class G1 #6 Marker
Inscription.  
Manufacturer: Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1897
Production era: 1889-1897
Quantity: 7
Length: 57 feet
Weight: 120,785 pounds (lbs.)
Boiler pressure: 180 pounds per square inch (psi)
Cylinders: 20 inches x 24 inches
Grates: 31 square feet
Speed: 35 miles per hour (mph)
Wheel configuration: 2-8-0
Tractive effort: 29,376 pounds-force (lbf)
Driver diameter: 50 inches
Tender capacity: 13.8 tons coal, 6,000 gallons water

Locomotives with a 2-8-0 wheel arrangement were one of the most popular steam engine types and were used throughout the United States. The G1 could pull up to 50 wooden rail cars at a speed of 35 miles per hour (mph). One of the most visually interesting features of this locomotive is the pilot, commonly known as the cowcatcher, on the front of the engine.

Steam locomotives during this era were hand fired, which means the coal was manually shoveled into the boiler by a locomotive fireman.

The Class G1 #6 was built

Norfolk & Western Class G1 #6 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 24, 2021
2. Norfolk & Western Class G1 #6 Marker
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in January 1897 for the Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railway. Its original number was 352. At the time of production, this locomotive cost $10,800.

This engine was sold in May 1917 to the Virginia-Carolina Railroad and was renumbered to 6. N&W reacquired the 6 in 1920 when the N&W purchased the Virginia-Carolina line. It was used on the Abingdon Branch which ran from Abingdon, Virginia, to West Jefferson, North Carolina. The 6 was last used to pull livestock cars on the Honaker Branch in the western part of Virginia in 1955. It was retired in January 1955. This is the oldest locomotive in the Museum's collection. Another example of this type of locomotive can be seen at the origination point of the Virginia Creeper Trail in Abingdon, Virginia.
 
Erected by Virginia Museum of Transportation, Inc.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1897.
 
Location. 37° 16.399′ N, 79° 56.754′ W. Marker is in Roanoke, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Norfolk Avenue Southwest and 3rd Street Southwest, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 303 Norfolk Ave SW, Roanoke VA 24016, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Boxcar #2305 (a few steps from this marker); Pennsylvania Railroad GE GG1 Electric #4919

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(a few steps from this marker); 1952 Squad Wagon (a few steps from this marker); Norfolk & Western Class CF Caboose #518302 (a few steps from this marker); Norfolk & Western Class A #1218 (a few steps from this marker); Norfolk & Western Safety Instruction Car #418 (a few steps from this marker); Chesapeake Western ALCO T-6 Diesel-Electric #10 (a few steps from this marker); Locomotive Parking Brakes (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Roanoke.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 30, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 30, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 30, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 15, 2021