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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Parkersburg in Wood County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

William L. “Mudwall” Jackson

 
 
William L. “Mudwall” Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 10, 2021
1. William L. “Mudwall” Jackson Marker
Inscription.  Born in Clarksburg on February 3, 1825, he served in the VA state legislature, as lieutenant governor of VA, and as circuit judge. In 1861 he became colonel of the 3lst VŔ Infantry. After serving on the staff of cousin Stonewall Jackson, he organized the 19th VA Cavalry in 1863 and. in 1864, was promoted to brigadier general. He moved to Kentucky and died March 24, 1890. “Mudwall”
 
Erected 2016 by West Virginia Archives & History.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is February 3, 1825.
 
Location. 39° 15.732′ N, 81° 34.18′ W. Marker is near Parkersburg, West Virginia, in Wood County. Marker is on Fort Boreman Drive 2˝ miles east of the Blennerhassett Heights exit (U.S. 50), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Parkersburg WV 26101, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Boreman Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Boreman During the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Parkersburg in 1861 (within shouting distance of this marker);
William L. “Mudwall” Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 10, 2021
2. William L. “Mudwall” Jackson Marker
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Fort Boreman (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Blennerhassett Island (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Parkersburg (West) Virginia (within shouting distance of this marker); The Beautiful Ohio River (within shouting distance of this marker); Railroads (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parkersburg.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia Entry. Excerpt
On April 15, 1865, six days after Gen. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House, Jackson disbanded his brigade. Refusing to surrender, however, he headed westwards, finally receiving a parole in Brownsville, Texas, on July 26, 1865.

Temporarily emigrating to Mexico, Jackson returned to what was now West Virginia, then learned that the new state barred former Confederate officers from practicing law in the state. He then moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where he was allowed to resume his practice of law. Jackson became a circuit judge again and kept this position for his remaining life.
(Submitted on May 5, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 5, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 5, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

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Jun. 20, 2021