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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sturgis in Meade County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Fate of the Mail Carrier

The Story of our History

 
 
The Fate of the Mail Carrier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ruth VanSteenwyk, April 24, 2021
1. The Fate of the Mail Carrier Marker
Inscription.  On this site, the evening of August 19, 1876, 24-year-old Charles "Red" Nolin, pony mail carrier was shot and scalped. He was asked by members of the Schofeld Freighting Outfit to stay with them for the night because of the presence of Indians in the area. He declined because he had promised his mother that he would return home one he completed his delivery. His body was found the next day and was buried here where it remained until 1889 when it was moved to Bear Butte Cemetery in Sturgis. Nolin was carrying mail from either Ft. Pierre or Sydney, NE to Deadwood.

Monument Builders
A group of Sturgis pioneers and Commercial Club formed a committee and enlisted the help of the Society of Black Hills Pioneers and the City of Sturgis to build the monument in early spring, 1932. The monument was restored and revitalized in 2017 by a group sponsored by the Regional Health Hospital Sturgis.

Construction
The monument which was designed by Roy Erickson, is a heavy square shaft built of rose and milky quartz, and silver ore. A long perpendicular slab with the word "Nolin" cut deep in it was donated by Consolidated Power
The Fate of the Mail Carrier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ruth VanSteenwyk, April 24, 2021
2. The Fate of the Mail Carrier Marker
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& Light Co. and a suitable plate carrying dates and data has been supplied by the society of Black Hills Pioneers. Rose quartz used on the project was gathered and donated by the Bow Scouts of Custer, the milky quartz was brought here and donated by the Boy Scouts of Nemo. Silver ore from Galena was obtained by Chris Jordan.
Deadwood Pioneer Time, Tuesday, April 12, 1932

The monument was dedicated
on Memorial Day, May 30, 1932 with 4000 people in attendance from all parts of the Black Hills, including representatives of Indian tribes. Seated at the monument were Jesse Brown (left) and Mrs. Tom (Cornelia) O'Brien (right) who were both members of the party that found the body.

Nolin Grave
The body of Charles Nolin was moved to Bear Bute Cemetery in Sturgis in June 1889 by local citizens. A new bronze marker by the Sturgis Senior Citizens and Chamber of Commerce Centennial Committee in 1982
 
Erected by Nolin Monument Committee.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical date for this entry is August 19, 1876.
 
Location. 44° 24.126′ N, 103° 30.536′ W. Marker is in Sturgis, South Dakota, in Meade County. Marker is at the intersection of Junction
Charles Nolin Monument image. Click for full size.
By Ruth VanSteenwyk, April 24, 2021
3. Charles Nolin Monument
Avenue and Harmon Street on Junction Avenue. Located near the Sturgis Regional Hospital. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2140 Junction Ave, Sturgis SD 57785, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Charles Nolin (here, next to this marker); Broken Promises (here, next to this marker); Charles Nolin, Pony Mail Carrier (here, next to this marker); Born of Opportunity (a few steps from this marker); Treaties are formed (a few steps from this marker); The Peace Keeping Post (a few steps from this marker); Civilian Conservation Corps Camps (approx. 1˝ miles away); Bear Butte (Mato Paha) Indian Camp (approx. 1˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sturgis.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 30, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 28, 2021, by Ruth VanSteenwyk of Aberdeen, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 28, 2021, by Ruth VanSteenwyk of Aberdeen, South Dakota. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 13, 2021