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Parkers Crossroads in Henderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Forrest Averts Disaster

 
 
Forrest Averts Disaster Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 3, 2021
1. Forrest Averts Disaster Marker
Inscription.  
"Finding my command now exposed to fire from both front and rear I was compelled to withdraw, which I did in good order."
Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest

Surrender or Fight
General Nathan Bedford Forrest was with the artillery on the opposite side of the battlefield when Colonel John Fuller's Ohio Brigade arrived. "I could not believe that they were Federals until I rode up myself into their lines" Forrest wrote in his after-action report. He had left Captain W.S. McLemore's battalion in Clarksburg, five miles north, to warn him of the approach of Union reinforcements. McLemore failed in his duties and the Confederates were caught completely by surprise. Forrest could surrender or fight—he chose the latter.

Quick Thinking
Grabbing a scratch force of his escort and a few nearby men, Forrest's small mounted force rushed at the charging Ohio troops. The bluff worked; the Union soldiers stopped. Taking advantage of the momentary half, Forrest and his escort turned south and retreated through the ravine to your left. It concealed them as they swept around Dunham and made for Lexington.

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few days after the Battle of Parker's Crossroads Forrest wrote, "Finding my command now exposed to fire from both front and rear I was compelled to withdraw, which I did in good order." Had Forrest not acted quickly and decisively his entire command might have been lost. BY going on the offensive he slowed the Union assault and saved most of his artillery and men.
 
Erected 2015 by Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Association.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is December 31, 1862.
 
Location. 35° 47.04′ N, 88° 23.171′ W. Marker is in Parkers Crossroads, Tennessee, in Henderson County. Marker is on Federal Lane 0.2 miles east of Tennessee Route 22, on the right when traveling east. Marker is located along the South Battlefield Trail, at Auto Tour Stop No. 7 of the Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Auto Tour. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wildersville TN 38388, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 7th Wisconsin Light Artillery (a few steps from this marker); Union Wagon Train (within shouting distance of this marker); Russell & Woodward's Advance (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Confederate Escape (about 400 feet away); Surprise and Chaos (about 400 feet away); The Battle of Parker's Crossroads
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(about 500 feet away); The Federal Forces (about 500 feet away); Dunham's Position (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parkers Crossroads.
 
Also see . . .  Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Association. (Submitted on May 29, 2021.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 28, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photo   1. submitted on May 28, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide shot of marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?

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Jun. 23, 2021