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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hamburg in Page County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mauck Meeting House

Circa 1790

 
 
Mauck Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, circa 2002
1. Mauck Meeting House Marker
Inscription.  
Built for religious purposes by the “Neighbors”, mainly Mennonites from Switzerland and southern Germany.

The outside of the one log walls were covered in 1851 with white weatherboards and the structure was roofed with chestnut shingles. A central heating chimney and tin roof were installed later. Heat was provided by a large six-plate stove made at the local iron furnace and inscribed D. Pennebacker – 1799.

Early Mennonite ministers were John Roads; Martin, David and Michael Kauffman; Jacob Strickler and Abraham Heiston. Early Baptist ministers were James Ireland and John Koontz. Mauck Meeting House was used by the Baptists from 1790 until 1899.
 
Erected by Page County Heritage Association.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Churches & Religion. A significant historical year for this entry is 1851.
 
Location. Marker has been reported damaged. 38° 39.498′ N, 78° 30.787′ W. Marker is in Hamburg, Virginia, in Page County. Marker is on Hamburg Road (County Route 766) 0.1 miles west of Lee Highway (U.S. 211/340), on the
Mauck Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 31, 2020
2. Mauck Meeting House Marker
The marker has significantly weathered.
Click or scan to see
this page online
right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 162 Hamburg Rd, Luray VA 22835, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Calendine (within shouting distance of this marker); The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) (approx. 1.2 miles away); Historic White House 1760 (approx. 1.2 miles away); White House Bridge (approx. 1.2 miles away); White House (approx. 1.2 miles away); Luray Caverns (approx. 1.6 miles away); The Beautiful Caverns of Luray (approx. 1.6 miles away); Car & Carriage Caravan Museum (approx. 1.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Avenue of Armies: Civil War Sites and Stories of Luray and Page County, Virginia. (Submitted on March 20, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.)
2. Mauck's Meetinghouse. Wikipedia article about the property (Submitted on November 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. Mauck Meeting House/Mill Creek Church
According to “Stonewall” Jackson biographer James I. “Bud” Robertson, the general halted late on May 22 at “a church to the east of White House Bridge.” It is probable that Mauck Meeting house in Hamburg is that church.

Once
Mauck Meeting House image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, circa 2002
3. Mauck Meeting House
here, Jackson learned that Gen. Richard S. Ewell with his two Confederate brigades, was just a few miles ahead. According to Robertson, “Jackson prayed long and hard that night.” Realizing that he held the upper hand in strength against a foe less than a days’ march to the north, “he sought to curb the excitement with expressions of faith.”

From pp. 61-62, Avenue of Armies: Civil War Sites and Stories of Luray and Page County, Virginia, by Robert H. Moore, II
    — Submitted March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.
 
Mauck Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 31, 2020
4. Mauck Meeting House Marker
Virginia Historic Landmark plaque on the meeting house image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 31, 2020
5. Virginia Historic Landmark plaque on the meeting house
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,327 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on May 31, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   2. submitted on November 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3. submitted on March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on November 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 13, 2021