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Newport in Perry County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Railroad Era

 

— Newport Heritage Park —

 
The Railroad Era Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 6, 2021
1. The Railroad Era Marker
Inscription.  
The Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) reached Newport in 1849 and connected with Pittsburgh by 1857. As with the 1829 Pennsylvania Canal, Newport area business and population increased.

By the late 1800s as many as seven passenger trains a day stopped in Newport. Twenty or more freights passed through the Borough on what was the nation's principle route west.

Until 1905 the PRR sliced through the town using 3rd Street as an artery. Occasionally, cinders from the coal burners started roof fires. Even with a town speed limit of 15 mph, horses were frightened, carriages wrecked and human life damaged or lost.

Between 1903 and 1905 hundreds of PRR contractors worked to relocate the tracks to a massive roadbed over the abandoned canal. An underpass was constructed to connect Market Street to the Juniata River Bridge. Therefore, accidents decreased as railroad efficiency increased. However, the town's view of and access to the river were greatly reduced.

In 1891, the Newport and Sherman's Valley Railroad (N&SVR), a narrow gauge track from western Perry County, opened with its terminus adjacent to the PRR station. Both were

Marker detail: First Newport Train, 1905 image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: First Newport Train, 1905
The first train crossed Newport on the tracks over the former Pennsylvania Canal in 1905.
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located on what is now a supermarket parking lot on Walnut Street. The N&SVR entered and exited Newport through Peach Alley.

The N&SVR ceased business in 1921 and the PRR halted Newport passenger service by the mid-1950s. In 2015 Norfolk Southern trains thundered through Newport carrying a significant portion of the nation's goods and raw materials. Amtrak, a remnant of PRR's prestigious passenger service, passed through Newport twice daily, never stopping.
 
Erected 2020 by Historical Society of Perry County.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars. A significant historical year for this entry is 1849.
 
Location. 40° 28.609′ N, 77° 7.962′ W. Marker is in Newport, Pennsylvania, in Perry County. Marker is at the intersection of Market Street (Pennsylvania Route 34) and 4th Street (Pennsylvania Route 849) on Market Street. Marker is located in Newport Heritage Park at the northeast corner of the intersection. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Newport PA 17074, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Newport Heritage Park (here, next to this marker); The Canal Era (here, next to this marker); St. Paul’s Lutheran Church (here, next to this marker); The Settlement of Newport (here, next to this

Marker detail: Newport, early 20th century image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Newport, early 20th century
This photograph taken before 1905 looks southeast. A supermarket, parking lot and the Post Office occupied this area circa 2015.
marker); Newport Historic District (a few steps from this marker); Newport Fugitive Slave Rescue (a few steps from this marker); Carson Long Military Institute (approx. 4.8 miles away); Carson Long Institute (approx. 4.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newport.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Newport Heritage Park
 
Also see . . .
1. Newport (Wikipedia). Newport was the eastern end of the Newport and Shermans Valley Railroad. There was a freight yard where railcars and cargo could be transferred to standard gauge for the Pennsylvania Railroad. (Submitted on June 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Newport and Shermans Valley Railroad (Wikipedia). The Newport and Shermans Valley Railroad was a nineteenth-century, 3 ft narrow gauge railroad. It ran from Newport, Pennsylvania to New Germantown, Pennsylvania. It carried lumber, and transferred it to the 4 ft 8˝ in standard gauge Pennsylvania Railroad at Newport. (Submitted on June 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Pennsylvania Railroad (Wikipedia). By 1882, the Pennsylvania Railroad
Marker detail: N&SRV Engine #6 image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: N&SRV Engine #6
Engine #6 of the Newport and Sherman's Valley Railroad, a narrow gauge track system. Note the cow catcher on the front of the engine.
had become the largest railroad (by traffic and revenue), the largest transportation enterprise, and the largest corporation in the world. Its budget was second only to the U.S. government. Over the years, it acquired, merged with or owned part of at least 800 other rail lines and companies. (Submitted on June 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Marker detail: Pennsylvania Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
5. Marker detail: Pennsylvania Railroad Station
The Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Newport circa 1905.
The Railroad Era Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 6, 2021
6. The Railroad Era Marker
(related markers & St. Paul's Lutheran Church in background)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 10, 2021. It was originally submitted on June 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Jun. 22, 2021