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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Sacramento in Sacramento County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Young America Engine Co. No. 6

Engine House

 
 
Young America Engine Co. No.6 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, March 29, 2009
1. Young America Engine Co. No.6 Marker
Inscription.  
Organized June 21, 1855.
Cornerstone laid January 1, 1858.
One of California’s most
noted firehouses.
This marker placed January 1, 1933
On its 75th anniversary by the
N.S.G.W. and N.D.G.W.
of the City of Sacramento.

 
Erected 1933 by Native Sons and Native Daughters of the Golden West, City of Sacramento.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 38° 34.869′ N, 121° 29.576′ W. Marker is in Sacramento, California, in Sacramento County. Marker is on 10th Street, on the right when traveling north. Marker is mounted on a base next to the wall of the parking garage located at the corner of “J” and 10th Streets. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sacramento CA 95814, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old City Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); A. J. Stevens Monument (about 400 feet away,
Young America Engine Co. No.6 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, March 29, 2009
2. Young America Engine Co. No.6 Marker
measured in a direct line); Sa’ Cumn’e Plaza (about 400 feet away); Tony's Corner (about 700 feet away); Bishop Alfonso Gallegos (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of First and Second State Capitols at Sacramento (approx. ¼ mile away); Pioneer Hall (approx. ¼ mile away); Sacramento Pioneers Society (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sacramento.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of the Sacramento Fire Department. The Sacramento Fire Department began as a volunteer department on February 5, 1850, one year after the City of Sacramento was incorporated. It is the first volunteer fire department in the western United States. On September 15, 1872 Sacramento City formed Engine Companies 1 and 2. Engine 1 was located on 2nd Street between K and L Streets (site of the Fire House Restaurant today), and Engine 2 at 10th Street between I and J Streets (presently marked by a historical plaque). (Submitted on April 2, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 

2. Young America Company Cupola. As reported in the Chairman’s Report of March 4, 2009, Pioneer Mutual Hook & Ladder Society
The bell tower sat atop the old volunteer
Young America Engine Co. No. 6 Fire Bell and Copola image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 2, 2009
3. Young America Engine Co. No. 6 Fire Bell and Copola
Located at the Sacramento Fire House #8, at 7990 H. Street.
Sacramento Fire Department Young America Company 6, which became the first paid Sacramento Fire Department Station 2. In the early 1930s the City sold the property and the station was torn down. The bell tower was preserved and eventually placed on the grounds of City Fire Station 8. When it was discovered that it had fallen into disrepair and apparently had a low priority with the City, Pioneer Mutual took on the responsibility of having the repairs done. We have met with the City's Preservation Office and they have inspected it and feel it could qualify as a historical landmark. We have started the process to qualify it for the local list. (Submitted on April 2, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 
 
Additional keywords. Volunteer Fire Departments
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Young America Engine Co. No.6 Marker image. Click for full size.
California State Library, Calif. History Section (McCurry Photo)
4. Young America Engine Co. No.6 Marker
Organized on June 21, 1855, Engine Company No.6 Young America, helped protect the city’s third ward. The volunteer members gathered in front of the firehouse, located on the east side of Tenth Street, between I and J Streets, with their engines and hose cart. The two-story brick building had its cornerstone laid January 1, 1858; its bell later rang for the first Pony Express rider.
 

More. Search the internet for Young America Engine Co. No. 6.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 2, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,530 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 2, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
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