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Vincennes in Knox County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Lincoln Memorial Bridge

 
 
Lincoln Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, June 19, 2021
1. Lincoln Memorial Bridge Marker
First Panel
Inscription.  From earliest times the Wabash River was a route between North and South. Here at a fording place it was crossed by a Buffalo Trace: an ancient path worn by countless animals and aborigines in their migrations between East and West. Near this meeting of ancient ways moundbuilders left vestiges of a remote past and forgotten races. Here in historic times Indians dwelt and traveled both land and water routes. French explorers and missionaries followed. Early in the eighteenth century was established Vincennes, the oldest settlement in this region.

From France, England won this region. In the War of the Revolution the British Commander in the Northwest came down the Wabash, making Fort Sackville at this crossing of ways the key to the frontier. George Rogers Clark with his troops followed the Buffalo Trace from Kaskaskia toward Vincennes and captured Fort Sackville. By this route came William Henry Harrison, first Governor of Indiana and Louisiana Territories. Pioneers came seeking new homes in Illinois and beyond the Mississippi. Here the youth Abraham Lincoln, making his last pioneer move, crossed the Wabash into Illinois.

The
Lincoln Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, June 19, 2021
2. Lincoln Memorial Bridge Marker
Second Panel
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Wabash River, dividing the States of Indiana and Illinois, was spanned after the Civil War by a bridge of timbers with an iron draw midstream. In 1931 the two states erected this bridge of concrete. It overlooks the scene of the victory which crowned the heroic march of Clark's little army from Kaskaskia. Forming a link in the central Continental Highway which replaces Buffalo Traces, Indian Trails, and dangerous fordings, this structure commemorates the opening of the West and the expansion of our country from Ocean to Ocean.
 
Erected 1932.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Bridges & ViaductsColonial EraWar, US Revolutionary.
 
Location. 38° 40.801′ N, 87° 32.046′ W. Marker is in Vincennes, Indiana, in Knox County. Marker is on Vigo Street (Indiana Route 441), on the left when traveling west. Marker is located at the Lincoln Memorial Bridge, on the grounds of George Rogers Clark National Historical Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vincennes IN 47591, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Patriotism of Charles Gratiot (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Ferry Landing (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Vincennes (within shouting distance of this marker); Vincennes in the American Revolution
Lincoln Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, June 19, 2021
3. Lincoln Memorial Bridge Marker
Third Panel
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Old Cathedral “French and Indian” Cemetery (about 300 feet away); Gold Star - - Honor Roll (about 300 feet away); Patrick Henry Square (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Patrick Henry Square (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vincennes.
 
View of the Lincoln Memorial Bridge from the George Rogers Clark Memorial image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, June 19, 2021
4. View of the Lincoln Memorial Bridge from the George Rogers Clark Memorial
The marker can be seen in the center of the bridge, just underneath the flagpole.
Lincoln Memorial Bridge Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, June 19, 2021
5. Lincoln Memorial Bridge Cornerstone
The cornerstone contains the year the bridge was dedicated (center), and the architectural firm who designed the bridge (bottom).
George Rogers Clark Memorial as seen from the Lincoln Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, June 19, 2021
6. George Rogers Clark Memorial as seen from the Lincoln Memorial Bridge
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 6, 2021. It was originally submitted on June 30, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 127 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 30, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Dec. 8, 2022