Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chinook in Pacific County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

In Search of Recognition

 
 
In Search of Recognition Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 27, 2021
1. In Search of Recognition Marker
Inscription.  After the U.S. government's failure to ratify the Tansy Point treaties signed by chiefs of five Chinookan tribes, the Chinook continued to hold tightly to their identity as a tribe and to their homeland. In 1855 on the Chehalis River, Washington Territorial Governor Isaac Stevens tried once again to sign a treaty with the Chinook and other tribes. Unlike Dart at Tansy Point, Stevens wanted them to leave their lands. The Chinook refused. In the years that followed, the Chinook were given many privileges only available to treaty tribes, including allotments and hunting and fishing privileges.

This changed in 1954 with the passage of the termination acts, through which the U.S. government sought to end all obligations to tribes. The U.S. eventually acknowledged the injustice of termination and restored the sovereignty of most tribes. The Chinook continue to seek this recognition.

"We are fully aware that the Chinooks are an Indian Tribe."Melvin E. Robertson Supt, Western Washington Agency 1954
"They acknowledged that we exist as Indian people but won't recognize
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
us officially as a tribe."
Gary Johnson, Chinook, 1996
Captions:
(top right) In 1910, Edward Curtis photographed Catherine Hawks George, who was known as Cha'ist to her descendants. Cha'ist attended Tansy Point negotiations, and was known for her remarkable recollection of names, family relationships and village locations of nearly all 1851 Chinookan treaty signers. Northwestern University Library. Edward S. Curtis's 'The Nortb American Indian': the Photographic Images, 2001
(bottom right) Chinook fishermen fashioned net weights like this one to sink the bottom of a seine net. NPS Collections
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Native Americans. A significant historical year for this entry is 1855.
 
Location. 46° 14.81′ N, 123° 54.613′ W. Marker is near Chinook, Washington, in Pacific County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 101, 1.7 miles State Route 401, on the right when traveling west. Marker is in Middle Village/Station Camp Park wayside. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 354 US-101, Chinook WA 98614, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. How Do These Stories Continue? (a few steps from this marker); The Business of Trade (a few steps from this marker); St. Mary's Church (a few steps from this marker); The Search for the Northwest Passage / Jefferson's Mission Accomplished
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
(within shouting distance of this marker); A Collision of Cultures / How Did They Live? (within shouting distance of this marker); What Are the First Stories of This Place? (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Middle Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Columbia (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chinook.
 
Regarding In Search of Recognition. The federal government tentatively approved the tribe's petition for recognition in 2001, but withdrew it in 2003 after the neighboring Quinault Indian Nation objected over historical territorial disputes.
 
Also see . . .  Members of Chinook Indian Nation liken lack of federal recognition to slow-motion ‘genocide’. By Anna V. Smith in The Oregonian, posted April 3, 2021. (Submitted on July 15, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 15, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photo   1. submitted on July 15, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide shot of marker and surrounding area in context. • Can you help?

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=177353

Paid Advertisement
Jan. 20, 2022