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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Megginson Rosenwald School

 
 
Megginson Rosenwald School Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), August 14, 2021
1. Megginson Rosenwald School Marker
Inscription.  The Megginson School was built here ca. 1923 for the African American students in the Pleasant Valley community, then part of Campbell County. Albert Megginson (1831-1923), formerly enslaved, purchased land in this area after the Civil War and later donated two acres for the school. The two-classroom building was constructed with financial support from local African Americans, the county, and the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which helped build more than 5,000 schools and supporting structures for black students in the rural South between 1917 and 1932. African American resident Wiley Gaines purchased school buses that transported students to this and other local segregated schools.
 
Erected 2018 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number Q-6-46.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansEducationRoads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the Rosenwald Schools, and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1923.
 
Location. 37° 23.402′ 
Megginson Rosenwald School Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), August 14, 2021
2. Megginson Rosenwald School Marker
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N, 79° 6.152′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Concord Turnpike and Spinoza Circle, on the right when traveling north on Concord Turnpike. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2830 Concord Turnpike, Lynchburg VA 24504, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lynchburg Defenses (approx. 1.7 miles away); Buffalo Lick Plantation (approx. 1.7 miles away); Chestnut Hill (approx. 1.9 miles away); Mount Athos (approx. 2 miles away); Central Virginia Training Center (approx. 2 miles away); Lynchburg Presbyterian Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Virginia Collegiate and Industrial Institute (approx. 2.1 miles away); Percival's Island Overlook (approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
Additional commentary.
1. The Origins of This Historical Marker
This historical marker was researched by Cynthia E. Gaines. The Megginson Rosenwald School historical marker started out as a grad school project. Ms. Gaines earned a graduate certificate in Public History from the University of Richmond in Richmond, Virginia. Her work and fundraising was instrumental in getting this marker erected.

She was home in Lynchburg for a family reunion held in the Megginson School when her oldest cousin told her that she had attended the school. The
The Megginson Rosenwald School Building image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), August 14, 2021
3. The Megginson Rosenwald School Building
grandson of Mr. Megginson was there and her cousin suggested that she speak with him. His grandfather was formerly enslaved and wanted his children to be educated.

The Megginson School was the second school the elder Mr. Megginson opened. The first school was not much more than a log cabin. Through her research, she found that several of her first cousins attended the Megginson School. They referred her to others that had attended the school as well, including the aforementioned Megginson grandson, Lorenzo Megginson. Mr. Megginson appeared with her at the Board of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources to talk about his family’s history, and this led to plans for this historical marker and her research and citations to back its text.

The last sentence on the marker mentions her grandfather Wiley Gaines. Because the county did not supply transportation for black children, he purchased buses to transport children in the county to the Megginson School. He, her dad, uncles, and some of her male cousins were bus drivers for the Megginson School.
    — Submitted June 5, 2022.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 5, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 19, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 342 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 19, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Jan. 30, 2023