Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mobile in Mobile County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Sand Town

 
 
Sand Town Marker side facing Springhill Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Jim Ellis, August 15, 2021
1. Sand Town Marker side facing Springhill Avenue
Inscription.  
Sand Town, the oldest African American neighborhood in the area of Spring Hill, in Mobile, Alabama, was established before 1845 by former enslaved and free, indigenous people of color. Sand Town residents built their own homes, school and places of worship and founded the Rising Sons Cemetery. It is a thriving community populated by multigenerational descendants of the original, proud and hard working property owners.

The Spring Hill School for Colored applied to open in 1873 and remained open through the 1948-1949 school year. The Mt. Hebron Methodist Church was formed in 1874. After a fire in 1884, a new church was constructed at the corner of Spring Hill Avenue and Knowles Street. Sand Town ancestors, former residents and veterans are buried in the Rising Sons Cemetery, located at the end of Knowles Street.

In 1937, under the guidance of Spring Hill College, St. Augustine Catholic Church, a log cabin, was built for Colored Catholics in the area. It existed until 1963, when many African American Catholics in Spring Hill began attending St Ignatius Catholic Church. Windows and doors for St. Augustine Church are installed
Sand Town Marker side facing church parking lot image. Click for full size.
By Jim Ellis, August 14, 2021
2. Sand Town Marker side facing church parking lot
Click or scan to see
this page online
in the Mt. Hebron A.M.E. Zion Church.

The community and descendants of Sand Town grew from the original founding families and residents listed below, who resided on Knowles Street:

• Christopher Knowles • Lewis Morgan
• Elizabeth Johnson • Theodore Johnson
• Manuel Milligan

Originally, Sand Town was comprised of land in and around Spring Hill Avenue and Knowles Street, and eventually grew to include Mordecai and Sheips Lanes and land to the Three Mile Creek.
 
Erected 2021 by Dora Franklin Finley African American-Heritage Trail.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & ReligionEducation. A significant historical year for this entry is 1845.
 
Location. 30° 42.325′ N, 88° 8.517′ W. Marker is in Mobile, Alabama, in Mobile County. Marker is at the intersection of Springhill Avenue and Knowles Street, on the right when traveling west on Springhill Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3800 Springhill Ave, Mobile AL 36608, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd / Founding Members (approx. 3.3 miles away); The Mitchell Home (approx. 3.4 miles away); Trinity Episcopal Church (approx. 3.6 miles away); Gen. William C. Gorgas
Sand Town marker perspective composite with view of road and church image. Click for more information.
By Jim Ellis, August 15, 2021
3. Sand Town marker perspective composite with view of road and church
"Welcome to Sand Town"
Community website homepage
Click for more information.
(approx. 3.6 miles away); Springhill Avenue Temple Congregation (approx. 3.6 miles away); Catholic Cemetery (approx. 4 miles away); St. Bridget's Catholic Church (approx. 4 miles away); Oaklawn Cemetery (approx. 4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mobile.
 
Regarding Sand Town. Sand Town's historic Rising Sons Cemetery is located just down Knowles Street at 921 Knowles Ln. For details on burials and access see Rising Sons Cemetery at Find-A-Grave.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 21, 2021, by Jim Ellis of Theodore, Alabama. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 21, 2021, by Jim Ellis of Theodore, Alabama. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=179993

Paid Advertisement
Nov. 28, 2021