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Huntsville in Walker County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The W.W. Adickes Addition to Oakwood Cemetery

 
 
The W.W. Adickes Addition to Oakwood Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2021
1. The W.W. Adickes Addition to Oakwood Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  Oakwood Cemetery was a gift to Huntsville from its founder, Pleasant Gray. In 1847 he deeded a 3.67-acre tract lying a quarter mile to the west as a "place of burial" for the community. The cemetery was gradually extended eastward by citizen donations, but by the early 1900s the area available for graves had reached Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive.

Funds to obtain adjoining acreage for cemetery expansion were provided in the 1919 Will of W. W. Adickes, a prominent local businessman and vice president of Gibbs National Bank. A suitable tract of about seven acres across the street from the previous boundary became available in 1925. A deed of sale to Oakwood Cemetery Association by Mrs. Rosa B. Lamkin and other family members stipulated that the new section was to be named the "W.W. Adickes Addition to Oakwood Cemetery."

The Steamboat House, where General Sam Houston died in 1863, was located near the tract's entrance. Following its removal, this site was preserved by the decision that no cemetery plots would be sold where the Steamboat House had stood.

Mrs. Annie C. Smither Adickes, widow of W.W. Adickes, made
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a final gift for the entrance. She contributed funds for the construction of the brick pillars and gateway with its arched wrought-iron signage. The Addition was in use by early 1927.

Oakwood Cemetery Association and the City of Huntsville entered into an agreement in 2002 transferring to the City responsibility for owning, maintaining, and operating all sections of Oakwood Cemetery. The Texas Historical Commission designated Oakwood Cemetery, including its Additions, as a Historic Texas Cemetery in 2003.
 
Erected by The Citizens of Huntsville, Texas.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Cemeteries & Burial Sites. A significant historical year for this entry is 1847.
 
Location. 30° 43.611′ N, 95° 32.564′ W. Marker is in Huntsville, Texas, in Walker County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Martin Luther King Drive and 9th Street. The marker is located at the entrance to the Oakwood Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 903 Martin Luther King Drive, Huntsville TX 77320, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Original Site of The Steamboat House (here, next to this marker); Elliott Toulmin Bowers (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Harmon Luther Lowman (about 400 feet away); Jesse Parker (about
The W.W. Adickes Addition to Oakwood Cemetery Marker is the marker on the left of the two markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2021
2. The W.W. Adickes Addition to Oakwood Cemetery Marker is the marker on the left of the two markers
500 feet away); Harry Fishburne Estill (about 600 feet away); Powell Sanctuary (about 800 feet away); Charles Norton Shaver (approx. 0.2 miles away); Honoring Unknown Graves (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntsville.
 
The view of the markers from the cemetery entrance image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2021
3. The view of the markers from the cemetery entrance
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 30, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 30, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 295 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 30, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Feb. 20, 2024