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Oakville in Live Oak County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Live Oak County Jail

 
 
Live Oak County Jail Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 29, 2021
1. Live Oak County Jail Marker
Inscription.  Oakville, seat of Live Oak County from 1856-1919, first called "On the Sulphur," was near a Nueces River crossing called Puente de la Piedra (Rock Crossing). Joseph Bartlett built a stone courthouse and attached log jail in 1857 as a center of authority. The county became part of the growing cattle industry following the Civil War. Oakville served as a commerce hub for freight wagons and a place for ranchers to buy supplies. The jail, with sheriff headquarters, made the town seem safer. J.S. Campbell oversaw the rebuilding of the courthouse with the jail placed inside during the 1870s. By 1887, Oakville constructed a free-standing two-story stone Italianate-style jail. The jail held frontier criminals ranging from bar fighters to horse thieves. In 1919, after losing a railway bid, a county election selected the town of George West as the new county seat. The old jail became one of the few standing structures in Oakville.

The Oakville Jail is made of sandstone from a nearby quarry. It is corniced with heavy sandstone as well. The stone facades and corners are covered in white stucco. Window sills remain, showing period ventilation.
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The first floor had a reception room, office and living quarters. The second floor housed jail cells, three for general holding and a fourth for women and juveniles. There are two corbelled chimneys, and a metal cistern at the rear of the building. The design is from the Diebold Lock and Safe Company of Canton, Ohio. The Oakville Jail and its twin in Mills County with their unique Diebold architecture are both listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2015
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18104.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureIndustry & CommerceLaw EnforcementSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1857.
 
Location. 28° 26.942′ N, 98° 6.084′ W. Marker is in Oakville, Texas, in Live Oak County. Marker is at the intersection of Talley Street and Curry Street, on the right when traveling south on Talley Street. The marker is located at the entrance to the old Courthouse by the fence. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oakville TX 78060, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Town of Oakville (within shouting distance of this marker); Oakville Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away); Early Schools in Live Oak County
The Live Oak County Jail and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 29, 2021
2. The Live Oak County Jail and Marker
(approx. 4.6 miles away); James and Sara Cunningham House (approx. 4.7 miles away); First State Bank Building (approx. 5 miles away); Jessy Franklin Gray (approx. 5 miles away); Felix Longoria (approx. 5 miles away); Three Rivers (approx. 5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oakville.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on private property but can be viewed from the street.
 
The view of the Live Oak County Jail and Marker from the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 29, 2021
3. The view of the Live Oak County Jail and Marker from the street
The Live Oak County Jail image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 29, 2021
4. The Live Oak County Jail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 2, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 2, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 196 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 2, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Feb. 27, 2024