Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sitka in Sitka Borough, Alaska — Northwest (North America)
 

Hanlon-Osbakken House

 
 
Hanlon-Osbakken House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 1, 2021
1. Hanlon-Osbakken House Marker
Inscription.  
Built about 1895, the Hanlon-Qsbakken house is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was home to three generations of the Hanion-Osbakken family, who trace their roots in Sitka to early Russian American days. The family held the property 1873-1991.

Frederick Richter originally purchased the lot in 1873, and shortly afterward was married to 16-year-old Anna Smackoff. Frederick died a few years later, leaving her with two small sons. Anna later married John Hanlon, and about 1895, Anna's brother-in-law William Sherigan built this Victorian Queen Anne style home for the Hanlon family. Local folklore claims that the house's yellow cedar planks were originally part of a local brewery which Frederick Richter once owned. Indoor plumbing and electric wiring were not part of the original construction, but were added later.

After Anna's death, her daughter Margaret continued living in the house, and raised her own family here. Margaret's husband John Osbakken built the long addition at the rear of the home, which served as a boat-building shop, in the late 1940s. The Osbakkens sold the house to the Breedlove family in
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
1991, and it was lovingly restored in 1992-93.

Photograph was taken about 1910. Left to right, it shows Zenia Hanlon (later Mrs. McGraw), Ike Hanlon, and Mrs. Anna Hanlon.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Architecture. A significant historical year for this entry is 1895.
 
Location. 57° 3.075′ N, 135° 19.898′ W. Marker is in Sitka, Alaska, in Sitka Borough. Marker is at the intersection of Lincoln Street and Monastery Street, on the right when traveling west on Lincoln Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 419 Lincoln Street, Sitka AK 99835, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Russian Mission Orphanage (within shouting distance of this marker); The Priest's House (within shouting distance of this marker); Russian Bishop's House (within shouting distance of this marker); Finding Common Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); Emmons House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. Michael's Cathedral (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sitka Woman's Club (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Michael's Russian Orthodox Cathedral (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sitka.
 
Regarding Hanlon-Osbakken House. Excerpt from the National Register registraion:
…The Hanlon-Osbakken House, built between 1892
Hanlon-Osbakken House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 1, 2021
2. Hanlon-Osbakken House Marker
Main marker is on the left (just outside the picture). The National Register plaque is by the front door.
and 1896, is one of two remaining Late Victorian Queen Anne style houses in Sitka. Of the two, it is the best representative of the architectural style. At the time of the house's construction, Sitka was the capital of the District of Alaska. The house is associated with a family that traces its roots in Sitka to the time when the community was the capital of Russian America. The period of significance starts when John and Anna Hanlon moved into the house in 1896, and ends when Anna Hanlon died in 1942.…
 
Hanlon-Osbakken House — Supplemental Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 1, 2021
3. Hanlon-Osbakken House — Supplemental Marker
This plaque by the door reads:
Hanlon-Osbakken
House

has been placed on the
National Register
of Historic Places

by the United States
Department of the Interior
c. 1895
Hanlon-Osbakken House image. Click for more information.
via NPS, unknown
4. Hanlon-Osbakken House
National Register of Historic Places Digital Archive on NPGallery website entry
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 11, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 213 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 11, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.   4. submitted on September 12, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=181588

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
U.S. FTC REQUIRED NOTICE: This website earns income from purchases you make after using links to Amazon.com. Thank you.
Paid Advertisements
Feb. 27, 2024