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Near Saint Paul in Howard County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

St. Wenceslaus Catholic Cemetery, Warsaw

 
 
St. Wenceslaus Catholic Cemetery, Warsaw Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 11, 2021
1. St. Wenceslaus Catholic Cemetery, Warsaw Marker
Inscription.  
The cemetery was established in 1876, one year after the first settlers of the Czech club “Slovania” arrived in the Warsaw vicinity. The plot was donated by Martin Slobodny. Initially, Sunday worship was held around a large wooden cross in the cemetery. In 1877 the community built their first church across the road, a small wooden building combining the sanctuary and the rectory.

Inspiration to build a larger church began during the tenure of Rev. John Stephen Broz (1890-94), who initiated many Czech customs into the community. The bell in the cemetery was acquired during his time. Construction of a brick church began in 1895. It was built by parishioner C. V. Svoboda and Andrew Gruber, proprietors of the St. Paul brickyard. It was blessed on the feast of St. Wenceslaus, September 28, 1895.

St. Wenceslaus of Warsaw was the first Catholic church in Howard County. The last mass offered was on December 21, 1949, and the church was demolished in 1964. Only the names on the monuments remind passersby of the Czech pioneers whose struggle made a future for their descendants.
 
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St. Wenceslaus Cemetery Association of Warsaw; and Nebraska State Historical Society. (Marker Number 402.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Nebraska State Historical Society series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1876.
 
Location. 41° 12.345′ N, 98° 34.205′ W. Marker is near Saint Paul, Nebraska, in Howard County. Marker is on 12th Avenue, 0.7 miles west of State Highway 11, on the left when traveling west. Marker is located at the northeast corner of the St. Wenceslaus Cemetery, facing 12th Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Paul NE 68873, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Howard County Courthouse (approx. 5.9 miles away); Ed Fleming (approx. 6 miles away); Grover Cleveland Alexander (approx. 6 miles away); Solon H. Borglum (approx. 15.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Czechs in Nebraska, Howard County, 1875. The Czech colony in this county was established with the aid of the Slovania Colonization Club in Omaha. In March, 1875, Vaclav L. Vodicka and Matej Nemec of Omaha and Vavrinec Dobes of New Prague,
St. Wenceslaus Catholic Cemetery, Warsaw Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 11, 2021
2. St. Wenceslaus Catholic Cemetery, Warsaw Marker
(looking southwest • cemetery in background)
Minn., as committee were sent out to investigate suitable lands for a colony. They recommended Howard County, especially that part lying between the Loup rivers and west of St. Paul, near the former post office called Warsaw. The center of the colony for a long time was located in the vicinity of the Czech Catholic church of St. Wenceslaus in Warsaw Precinct. (Submitted on September 14, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Five Kratochvil Children (Find a Grave). Frank - buried March 12, Agnes - buried March 17, Rose - buried March 18, Mari - buried March 19 and Ann - buried March 22. Information from the family bible indicates the year was 1895, however, the monument erected fairly recently indicates the death year as 1893. My grandfather, Frank Kratochvil, buried his children alone, as they died from the black diphtheria and the Parish priest refused to come out to the graves either due to the cold weather or fear of the diphtheria.
—From Roxie Freeman (Submitted on September 14, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Kratochvil Family Gravestone, St. Wenceslaus Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 11, 2021
3. Kratochvil Family Gravestone, St. Wenceslaus Cemetery
(a reminder of the early settlers’ challenges and hardships)
Five children interred here died from disease in 1892. Carried by their father individually one mile in mid-winter through snow to bury his children by himself.
Kratochvil Family Gravestone,<br>St. Wenceslaus Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 11, 2021
4. Kratochvil Family Gravestone,
St. Wenceslaus Cemetery
St. Wenceslaus Cemetery Gravestones image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 11, 2021
5. St. Wenceslaus Cemetery Gravestones
Surnames here, such as Novak, Volf, Kremlacek and Kratochvil, are reminders of immigrant heritage.
St. Wenceslaus Cemetery Gate image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 11, 2021
6. St. Wenceslaus Cemetery Gate
(just west of marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 14, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 13, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 139 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 14, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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May. 24, 2024