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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sandusky in Erie County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Johnsonís Island

 
 
Johnsonís Island Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 12, 2021
1. Johnsonís Island Marker
Inscription.  Johnsonís Island, in the Bay opposite Sandusky, was a prison for Confederate soldiers 1862-1865. Nothing remains of the prison except its cemetery and the earthworks of two old forts.
 
Erected 1969 by The Erie County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 41° 27.444′ N, 82° 42.823′ W. Marker is in Sandusky, Ohio, in Erie County. Marker is on West Shoreline Drive east of Jackson Street, on the left when traveling east. It is at the pedestrian entrance to Jackson Street Pier, facing Shoreline Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sandusky OH 44870, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Underground Railroad (a few steps from this marker); G.A. Boeckling Building (within shouting distance of this marker); The Hinde & Dauch Paper Company (within shouting distance of this marker); Hubbard Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); State Theatre (about 400 feet away); Donahue Hardware
Johnsonís Island Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 12, 2021
2. Johnsonís Island Marker
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(about 500 feet away); Jay Cooke (about 700 feet away); Sandusky / Erie County (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sandusky.
 
Also see . . .  Island History Ė Civil War Era. Excerpt:
During the 40 months the Depot was in operation, over 9,000 prisoners crossed Sandusky Bay to the Federal Docks and then were confined in the twelve prison blocks inside the stockade. Periods of confinement varied depending on when the prisoners arrived. For the most part, the first prisoners in 1862 were exchanged after only five months while those arriving after Gettysburg in July 1863 stayed for 12 to 18 months. The average number of prisoners confined at any one time was probably 2,000 to 2,500. The maximum number confined was approximately 3,200 prisoners in January of 1865. This number was considerably larger than the capacity based on available bed space.
(Submitted on October 4, 2021.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 4, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 4, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 23 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 4, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

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Jan. 20, 2022