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Deadwood in Lawrence County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
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Ride High, T.C., Ride High

— Days of 76 —

 
 
Ride High, T.C., Ride High Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Beverly Pfingsten, June 7, 2011
1. Ride High, T.C., Ride High Marker
Inscription.  Travis Calvin Holloway began his career as a professional cowboy in the family's living room near Eagle Butte, South Dakota, where he rode his first bucking horse - his brother Chuck. When Chuck would no longer unseat his younger sibling, their father built T.C. a bucking barrel. The aspiring bronc rider offered his other brothers and sisters a dollar for every hour they would buck him on the contraption. So practiced, T.C. entered his first rodeo at the age of five.

Born to rodeo champ Johnny Holloway and his wife Sharyn on April 4, 1977, T.C. felt the cowboy blood in his veins as a very early age. Not only was his great-uncle Casey Tibbs, a six-time world saddle bronc rider, but his parents staged rodeos for a living, giving T.C. ample chances for practice. As a teenager, T.C. qualified for the National High School Rodeo Finals three times. During his first year of college, he qualified for the College National Finals Rodeo, where he finished third.

His successes landed him in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in 1997. He took the rodeo world by storm, winning the Saddle Bronc Championship at the Badlands Circuit Finals
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and the coveted Resistol Saddle Bronc Rookie of the Year award during his first year on the professional circuit. He went on to compete in the National Finals Rodeo in 2000, the same year that he won the saddle bronc event at the Days of '76 Rodeo in Deadwood, where he was a regular contestant.

T.C. was killed on August 28, 2001 in a car accident near Faith, South Dakota. This half life-size bronze, titled Ride High, T.C., Ride High was sculpted by western artist Tony Chytka and is based on several photographs of T.C. riding broncs in rodeos. It was dedicated on May 27, 2005.

The statue is being displayed in Deadwood at the request of the Holloway family, who has special ties with the community. Members of the Holloway family remain regulars at the Days of '76 Rodeo in Deadwood.

For more information, please visit the History and Information Center at 3 Siever St.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsEntertainmentSports. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1944.
 
Location. Marker has been permanently removed. It was located near 44° 22.571′ N, 103° 43.856′ W. Marker was in Deadwood, South Dakota, in Lawrence County. Marker was at the intersection of Shrine Street and Upper Main Street on Shrine Street. Touch for map
Ride High, T.C., Ride High Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Beverly Pfingsten, June 7, 2011
2. Ride High, T.C., Ride High Marker
. Marker was in this post office area: Deadwood SD 57732, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced. This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Deadwood’s Grand Bandstand (here, next to this marker); Black Hills Trust and Savings Bank (a few steps from this marker); Waite Block Annex (within shouting distance of this marker); History Buried Beneath Your Feet (within shouting distance of this marker); Serving the Black Hills (within shouting distance of this marker); Deadwood's Carnegie Library (within shouting distance of this marker); Jack McCall Capture Site (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Weight a Minute (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Deadwood.
 
Marker removed sometime in the last decade. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Connor Olson, October 9, 2021
3. Marker removed sometime in the last decade.
This photo shows the same side of the street with both the marker and the horse sculpture gone.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 1, 2011, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,115 times since then and 90 times this year. Last updated on October 5, 2021, by Connor Olson of Kewaskum, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 1, 2011, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   3. submitted on October 9, 2021, by Connor Olson of Kewaskum, Wisconsin. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 23, 2024