Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Castalian Springs in Sumner County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Bledsoe's Fort, 1783-1806

 
 
Bledsoe's Fort, 1783-1806 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, April 11, 2021
1. Bledsoe's Fort, 1783-1806 Marker
Inscription.  
Digging into the Past
Historic documents and archaeological excavations conducted by Dr. Kevin Smith, Middle Tennessee State University, have revealed a great deal about Bledsoe's Fort. The Bledsoe family built the first cabins about 1783. One cabin housed Isaac and Katherine Bledsoe and their two, perhaps three, children. Anthony and Mary Bledsoe and their eight children lived in another. At least five African American slave families and one or two white servants also lived in the fort complex.

A Safe Haven
Archaeological excavations tell us that the fort was rectangular and occupied about 1.5 acres. There were fifteen or more plain log buildings in the fort, each approximately 16 by 20 feet. Hastily constructed fortifications connected or enclosed the buildings. The fort expanded as the number of settlers grew and Native American attacks increased. At its peak, more than 100 people lived here. At any given time, one-third to one-half of the residents were enslaved African Americans.

Keeping Up Standards and Making Do
Glass jewels, silver-plated buckles, cuff links and fancy buttons
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
reveal that the residents dressed much as they had back east. Gunflints from France and England remind us that Bledsoe's Fort had contact with the greater world. That most of the flints were badly worn speaks of ammunition shortages the fort's inhabitants faced. Table knives with antler handles attest to the settlers' resourcefulness.

Pork, Beef and Imported China
Animal remains recovered from pits and root cellars indicate that residents often dined on pork, beef and chicken. Surprisingly, archaeologists found relatively few deer, small wild mammal or wild bird bones. Residents set their tables with imported British dinnerware, but used locally made red earthenware vessels for storage. Fragments of gaudy hand-painted tea bowls suggest that women continued the ritual of afternoon tea even on the frontier.

[Captions:]
This view of Bledsoe's Fort is based on research and information recovered in archaeological investigations. The fort, no longer needed for protection, was abandoned in 1806. Bill Puryear
 
Erected by Tennessee Wars Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansForts and CastlesSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1783.
 
Location. 36° 24.017′ 
Bledsoe's Fort, 1783-1806 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, April 11, 2021
2. Bledsoe's Fort, 1783-1806 Marker
N, 86° 19.23′ W. Marker is in Castalian Springs, Tennessee, in Sumner County. Marker can be reached from Hartsville Pike (Tennessee Route 25) 0.6 miles west of Rock Springs Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 175 Rock Springs Rd, Castalian Springs TN 37031, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Bledsoe's Fort (here, next to this marker); Isaac Bledsoe (a few steps from this marker); Bledsoe Monument (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hugh Rogan (about 700 feet away); Bill "Hoss" Allen (about 700 feet away); A Pioneer Cemetery (about 700 feet away); Rogana (about 800 feet away); Bledsoe's Fort Historical Park (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Castalian Springs.
 
An artist's depiction of how Bledsoe Fort may have looked during construction image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, April 11, 2021
3. An artist's depiction of how Bledsoe Fort may have looked during construction
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 8, 2021, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. This page has been viewed 125 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 8, 2021, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=183318

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 20, 2024