Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
REMOVED
SEE LOCATION SECTION
 

The Battle of Cedar Mountain

The Federal Attack Reaches Its Climax

 
 
The Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. The Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker
Inscription.  The fighting turned desperate and many combatants struggled hand-to-hand. Some of Crawford's Federal soldiers passed completely behind the 21st Virginia and entered the road near the Confederate artillery line. Confederate soldier John Worsham of the 21st Virginia noted, "I have heard of a 'hell spot' in some battles, this was surely one." He continued, "A great dread filled me for Jackson, because I had seen him at this spot only a moment before." "Stonewall" Jackson was in peril, in the thick of the fight, and it seemed that his command was on the verge of being defeated. However the Federal commander did not send in reinforcements quickly enough, and the Union attack lost its momentum along the Crittenden Lane. Jackson rallied his men and received timely reinforcements from A.P. Hill. By about 6:30 p.m. Banks' Federals were in retreat and Jackson's men were counterattacking and on their way to victory.

Help Preserve Battlefields, Call CWPT at 1-888-606-1400

Friends of Fredericksburg Area Battlefields - www.fofab.org

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Park Service. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust
Friends of Fredericksburg Area Battlefields.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. Marker has been permanently removed. It was located near 38° 24.392′ N, 78° 3.906′ W. Marker was near Culpeper, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker could be reached from the intersection of Dove Hill Road (County Route 642) and James Madison Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north. Located at the third trail stop for the Civil War Preservation Trust's Cedar Mountain Battlefield walking trail. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Culpeper VA 22701, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced. This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. A different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (here, next to this marker); a different marker also
Civil War Preservation Trust image. Click for more information.
2. Civil War Preservation Trust
named Battle of Cedar Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tenth Maine (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Culpeper.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker is a photo showing "Officers of the 10th Maine stand in the middle of the wheatfield (in front of you) where their regiment stood and fought. This photo, taken a few days after the battle, still shows evidence of the fighting that took place there." On the right a map shows the tactical situation on August 9, 1862 between 6:45 and 7:30 p.m. "As Jackson rallied his men in the woods behind you, A.P. Hill's division arrived on the scene.
Map of the Battle at the Phase Described on the Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Map of the Battle at the Phase Described on the Marker
Hill's men launched a counterattack that sent the Federals in full retreat."
 
Regarding The Battle of Cedar Mountain. Since posting of this marker, the Friends of the Fredericksburg Area Battlefields web site has moved to www.parksonline.org/fofab/index.htm.

This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Cedar Mountain. See the Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers linked below.
 
Third Trail Stop at Cedar Mountain image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
4. Third Trail Stop at Cedar Mountain
Six small unit cornerstones stand in a row beside the marker.
Unit Marking Stones image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, October 13, 2012
5. Unit Marking Stones
Marker is seen in the distance.
Unit Marking Stones image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
6. Unit Marking Stones
The six marking stones indicate the presence of several units at this point on the battlefield. The closest to the camera is inscribed "7th O" for the 7th Ohio Infantry regiment. The second is "66th O" for the 66th Ohio Infantry. The third with "109 PA" indicates the 109th Pennsylvania Infantry. Fourth is labeled "Bests Bal" in reference to Captain C. L. Best's Federal artillery. The fifth is "No 20 Penn Ca" which may reference the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry which was engaged here. Last in line is "Knapps Bal" designating Captain J.M. Knapp's Federal artillery.
Crawford's Advance image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
7. Crawford's Advance
Looking northeast from the marker's location. Between 5:45 and 6:15 in the afternoon, Crawford's Brigade advanced from the high ground beyond Dove Hill Road against the Confederates line, mostly composed of Winder's (Stonewall) Division. Crawford's advance was on the west side of and generally parallel to the Orange and Culpeper Road. From east to west the regiments engaged were the 5th Connecticut, 28th New York, 46th Pennsylvania, and the 3rd Wisconsin. The 46th Pa Infantry entered the tree line behind the left flank of the 1st Virginia Battalion, thus turning the Confederate position.
Collapse of the Confederate Line image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
8. Collapse of the Confederate Line
Looking to the south from the marker. At the time of the battle this rise was heavily wooded. With three surges, Crawford managed to drive Garnett's Brigade back. In the course of these attacks, the Federal brigade had turned ninety degrees and then began advancing to the east on Crittenden Lane. As a result, the Confederate artillery in the area of the gate limbered and retreated. In addition the Confederate brigades of Taliaferro (who was now commanding Winder's Division) and Early were forced to fall back, lest they too be flanked by Crawford.
Cedar Run Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, October 13, 2012
9. Cedar Run Baptist Church
Located at 21210 Old Orange Road to the northeast of the marker, the Confederates set their final line in this vicinity and shelled the retreating Federals with artillery under Captain Willie Pegram.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 21, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,092 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on October 16, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 30, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on March 16, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia.   6, 7, 8. submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   9. submitted on March 16, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=183954

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 14, 2024