Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Corinth in Alcorn County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Trailhead Park

Starting point to explore Corinth's Rich Civil War Heritage

 
 
Trailhead Park Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bernard Fisher, October 14, 2021
1. Trailhead Park Marker
Inscription.  In 1991, the Secretary of the Interior designated sixteen Civil War historic sites in and around Corinth, Mississippi, as the Siege and Battle of Corinth National Historic Landmark District.

A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Only about 3% of the listings on the National Register of Historic Places are recognized as National Historic Landmarks.

In the quarter century since then, many of these historic resources, including battlefields, earthworks, and antebellum homes, have been preserved and made available to the visiting public. (Seven are now part of Shiloh National Military Park.)

More recent research has highlighted thegmportance of other Civil War historical sites, such as the Corinth Contraband Camp, commemorated at a NPS memorial park overlooking Phillips Creek.< br>
Trailhead Park is an excellent starting point for visiting one or more of these nationally significant sites.

2•Battery F After occupying Corinth Fcåem: streagthened the touwn's outer defenses by building
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
a half dozen redoubts (named Batteries A through F). Of these six, only Battery F survives, located west of town in the Pine Lake Estates subdivision, just south of the Memphis and Charleston rilroad.

3•Battery Robinett Located where he fell, the grave of Confederate Colonel William P. Rogers pictured here leading the 2nd Texas Infantry just before he was killed during an attack on Battery Robinett, may be found behind the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center.

5•Verandah House During the Union and Confederate occupations of Corinth, four surviving homes served as headquarters for generals on opposing sides. Today, Duncan House, Fishpond House, and Oak Home are private residences, with wayside exhibit panels visible from the street. The Verandah Hosue was given to the City of Corinth by the Curlee Family in the 1960's.

6•Oak Home This house on Fillmore Street served as the headquarters of Confederate Major General Leonidas Polk from later March to May 29, 1862.

9•Railroad Crossover For six months in 1862, this crucial railroad junction made Corinth second only to Richmond in importamce for Civil War planning and strategy.

10•Confederate Earthworks Surviving Confederate artillery fortifications north of town (such as this section on the Beauregard Line, known as a salient) are among the nation's
Trailhead Park Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bernard Fisher, October 14, 2021
2. Trailhead Park Marker
finest examples of early Civil War earthworks.

12•Union Siege Lines

15•Corinth National Cemetery was established in 1866 as a central burial site for approximately 2,300 Union casualties of the Battle of Corinth and similar clashes in the surrounding area. By late 1870 there were more than 5,688 internments in the cemetery—1,793 known and 1,895 unknown soldiers. The dead represented 273 regiments from 15 states. In addition, there are three Confederate internemnts in the cemetery—one unknown and two known soldiers.

Corinth Contraband Camp The security offered by the U.S. Army during its 20-month occupation of Corinth attracted Afican-Americans fleeing nearby plantations and farms in search of freedom. Union General Grenville Dodge organized the Contraband Camp to accomodate these refugees. Stretching over acres of corn and gardens, and described as a model facility, the camp featured a church, a school, and a hospital, plus numerous houses.

By the fall of 1863, over 1,000 African-American residents of the camp, both children and adults, had gained the ability to read, through the efforts of benevolent organizations as the American Missionary Association.

Once emancipation was proclaimed, nearly 2,000 men at the Contraband Camp seized the opportunity to protect their new way of life by enlisting in a new
Trailhead Park Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bernard Fisher, October 14, 2021
3. Trailhead Park Marker
African-American regiment of the Union army.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 56.082′ N, 88° 31.296′ W. Marker is in Corinth, Mississippi, in Alcorn County. Marker is at the intersection of Jackson Street and Cruise Street, on the right when traveling south on Jackson Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Corinth MS 38834, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Decision at the Crossroads (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named "Decision at the Crossroads" (a few steps from this marker); War in a Railroad Town (a few steps from this marker); View Toward Batteries Robinett and Williams (within shouting distance of this marker); "A beehive of activity..." (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Tishomingo Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of the Corinth House Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); Corinth Panorama — 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corinth.
 
Civil War Corinth - Trailhead Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bernard Fisher, October 14, 2021
4. Civil War Corinth - Trailhead Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 16, 2021, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 329 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 16, 2021, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=183967

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 21, 2024