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Butte in Silver Bow County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Butte-Anaconda Historic District

 
 
Butte-Anaconda Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, July 12, 2021
1. Butte-Anaconda Historic District Marker
Inscription.  It took millions of miles of copper to build the telegraph, telephone, and electrical lines that transformed the United States from a collection of small, isolated communities to a cohesive, industrialized nation. Looming gallows frames and the towering Anaconda Company smokestack recall the industrial roots of these sister cities, the source of much of that copper. Extracting the metal was hazardous work, and the danger bred solidarity among miners and smelterworkers. Two of the nation’s most radical unions had their roots in Butte and Walkerville, “The Gibraltar of Unionism.” They were the Western Federation of Miners and the Industrial Workers of the World, whose rhetoric opposing “wage slavery” challenged the foundations of American capitalism. Clashes between capitalism and labor marked the district, especially after the 1917 Butte Granite Mountain/Speculator Mine fire, the worst hard-rock mining disaster in the nation’s history. Labor unrest and years under martial law followed in Butte, while in Anaconda, the Company fired suspected Socialists and agitators, devastating the unions. Butte and Anaconda workers reorganized during the New
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Deal after the federal government guaranteed the right of workers to unionize. Their four-month industry-wide strike in 1934 precipitated the birth of the CIO, an organization that helped rejuvenate the labor movement nationwide. In 2006, the National Park Service recognized Butte, Anaconda, and Walkerville’s significance to the intertwined histories of mining and labor by declaring the district a National Historic Landmark. It is the largest NHL in the West, covering the period 1876-1934 and encompassing nearly 10,000 acres with over 6,000 contributing resources.
 
Erected by Montana Historical Society.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: LandmarksNotable Places. In addition, it is included in the Montana National Register Sign Program series list.
 
Location. 46° 0.866′ N, 112° 32.326′ W. Marker is in Butte, Montana, in Silver Bow County. Marker is on West Granite Street near North Montana Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 155 West Granite Street, Butte MT 59701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Silver Bow County Courthouse (here, next to this marker); Carpenters' Union Hall (a few steps from this marker); Silver Bow Club
Butte-Anaconda Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, July 12, 2021
2. Butte-Anaconda Historic District Marker
Marker on the left
(within shouting distance of this marker); Butte Telephone Company (within shouting distance of this marker); School District #1 Administration Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lawlor & Rowe Insurance Company (about 300 feet away); Henry Jacobs House (about 300 feet away); Leonard Apartments (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Butte.
 
Silver Bow County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, July 12, 2021
3. Silver Bow County Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 27, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 27, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 107 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 27, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.

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Feb. 21, 2024