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Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Return from the Argonne

 
 
Return from the Argonne Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, November 21, 2021
1. Return from the Argonne Marker
Inscription.  On May 12, 1919, three trains with 1,451 survivors of the original 3,677 soldiers of Alabama's 167th Infantry arrived at Montgomery Union Station to parade to the Capitol. The Return from the Argonne Memorial, by sculptor James Butler, R.A., remembers their last battle of WWI in the Argonne. On October 16, 1918, Alabama's 167th Infantry and Iowa's 168th Infantry in Brigadier General Douglas MacArthur's 84th Brigade of the 42nd Rainbow Division, assisted by the 151st Georgia Machine Gun Battalion, captured the Côte de Châtillon, the final obstacle standing between the Allied Army and Germany on the Hindenburg Line. It opened the road to the Rhine River and the final push that would lead the Germans to request an Armistice on November 11, 1918.

The Return from the Argonne Memorial also honors all Alabamians who fought in the Argonne between September and November 1918: this includes the Alabamians in the 31st Dixie Division who served as replacements in other divisions as well as the African American soldiers, mostly from Alabama, in the 366th Infantry Regiment of the 92nd Division. They saw combat in the Argonne on November 10 and
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11.

Another Alabama native son, James Reese Europe, from Mobile, served in the Meuse-Argonne campaign. A famous musician, he led the military band of the 369th regiment (Harlem Hell Fighters) which brought jazz to Europe.

The Return from the Argonne is a gift to the City of Montgomery from the Croix Rouge Farm Memorial Foundation through the generosity of Nimrod Thompson Frazer, Silver Star, Korea. It is in memory of his father, William Johnson Frazer, Purple Heart, World War I. He never forgot his fellow soldiers.

The United States World War One
Centennial Commission

 
Erected 2021 by Croix Rouge Farm Memorial Foundation & Nimrod Thompson Frazer.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in this topic list: War, World I. A significant historical date for this entry is May 12, 1919.
 
Location. 32° 22.815′ N, 86° 18.852′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Memorial is on Water Street, 0.1 miles west of Commerce Street, on the right when traveling west. Located in front of the Montgomery Union Railway Station. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 Water St, Montgomery AL 36104, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Train Shed 1897 (within shouting distance of this marker); Rainbow Soldier (within shouting distance of this marker); Europeans Along the Alabama River
Return from the Argonne Marker with view of Union Station. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, November 21, 2021
2. Return from the Argonne Marker with view of Union Station.
Another WWI monument, the Rainbow Soldier, can be seen below the station portico.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Alabama River: The Grand Avenue (about 300 feet away); Transportation and Commerce (about 300 feet away); Montgomery (about 400 feet away); The Domestic Slave Trade / Slave Transportation to Montgomery (about 500 feet away); Encanchata (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment – History. (Submitted on November 21, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Montgomery Independent- Return from the Argonne: Bronze sculpture by James Butler, R.A.
This work of art doesn’t have an easy subject. Future viewers will certainly be disturbed by the subject matter. It is about a soldier who has just been picked up from the battle for the Côte de Châtillon in the Argonne.

Works of art in the heart of town, representing a dead man, are not customary in U.S. villages or towns like they are in France or Great Britain. Americans like to be confronted with the positive and don’t like to be made uncomfortable.

This new sculpture, and its disturbing subject matter of a dead soldier, will provoke the viewers and ensure that the deep sacrifices
Return from the Argonne Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, November 21, 2021
3. Return from the Argonne Marker
made by Alabama in World War I are not forgotten, that young generations learn about World War I, whose horrors have been eclipsed by those of other wars, that they understand how World War I pro-pulsed the United States as a world power and started the American century.
(Submitted on November 21, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.) 
 
Return from the Argonne statue sculptors' mark. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, November 21, 2021
4. Return from the Argonne statue sculptors' mark.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 21, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 21, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 207 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 21, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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May. 29, 2024