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Bristol in Bristol County, Rhode Island — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Bridge Construction

Mount Hope Bridge

 
 
Bridge Construction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, July 3, 2018
1. Bridge Construction Marker
Inscription.  
The Mount Hope Bridge was built as a private toll bridge by the Mount Hope Bridge Co. after state proposals for a public bridge were defeated. In 1927, Dr. David B Steinman, the noted New York bridge engineer, produced the design for a graceful suspension bridge. His firm, Robinson and Steinman, supervised its construction. The McClintic-Marshall Construction Company was the general contractor and the combined work force totaled nearly 500 men.

Steinman’s design included several innovations that allowed the bridge to be built in just 22 months with significant cost savings. with a main span of 1,200 feet and an overall length of 6,130 feet, the new bridge was the eighth longest bridge in New England until the Newport Pell Bridge was completed in 1969.

Construction began with the upper-arches and the viaduct spans at either end. Next came the main piers in the channel and the towers on top of them., which reached 325 feet above the water. Huge masonry anchorages weighing 8,000 and 27,000 tons were then built on either shore to anchor the two main cables, which were fabricated by spinning thousands of miles of steel
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wire back and fourth from shore to shore over the tops of the towers. Each cable is eleven inches in diameter, consists of 2,450 wire strands and weighs 350 tones. Once the cables were spun and wrapped, the steel frame of the central span was lifted into place and suspended from the cables by vertical hangers. The concrete roadway was then poured and on October 24, 1929, the Mount Hope Bridge was opened to traffic.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Bridges & Viaducts. A significant historical date for this entry is October 24, 1929.
 
Location. 41° 38.76′ N, 71° 15.708′ W. Marker is in Bristol, Rhode Island, in Bristol County. Marker is on Ferry Road (Rhode Island Route 114) east of Old Ferry Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bristol RI 02809, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. An Artistic Bridge (here, next to this marker); Washington Crossed Here (here, next to this marker); Mount Hope Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); W 3 R (approx. one mile away); The Herreshoff Manufacturing Company (approx. 1.3 miles away); Tow Tank Model (approx. 1.3 miles away); Portsmouth Compact (approx. 1½ miles away); Coast Guard Memorial (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bristol.
 
Also see . . .
Bridge Construction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, July 3, 2018
2. Bridge Construction Marker

1. Mount Hope Bridge. (Submitted on November 27, 2021, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio.)
2. Mount Hope Bridge (Wikipedia). (Submitted on November 29, 2021, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Bridge Construction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, July 3, 2018
3. Bridge Construction Marker
Bridge Construction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, July 3, 2018
4. Bridge Construction Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 27, 2021, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 192 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 27, 2021, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 12, 2024