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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Springtown in Parker County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead

 
 
William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J Frye Fort Worth TX, February 18, 2022
1. William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead Marker
Inscription.  

William (Bill) Woody (1824-1915), one of the first Anglo settlers in Parker County, was born in Roane County, Tennessee. While living in the eastern Tennessee hills bordering North Carolina, he married Elisabeth Lydia Farmer (1822-1879) in 1846. In December 1846, six weeks after the birth of their son, the Woody family set out to Texas on foot with few possessions. Six months later, they arrived in Honey Grove in Fannin County where they met up with other family members and established a working farm. In 1851, the family traveled to White Settlement in Tarrant County where they stayed until their home was built here by 1855. Located in the Vealís Station Community, the Woody family built a story-and-a-half, four-room dogtrot home using hand-sawn yellow pine lumber transported by ox from New Orleans.

Once their house was complete, it served several distinct and important purposes for the Vealís Station Community. The property was used as a refuge and stagecoach stop for pioneer travelers, a boarding house for college students attending Parsons College, and a community meeting place for all religious denominations in the area,
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as well as a cobblerís workshop for hand-cobbled boots and shoes. In 1858, Bill Woody and community members built a two-story frame meeting house on the property which provided a church, masonic hall, town hall, common school, and later Parsons College, chartered in 1874, for the town of Vealís Station. Elisabeth and Bill Woody are buried in the Vealís Station Cemetery, both examples of rugged individualism that expanded the state and country in the nineteenth century.
 
Erected 2018 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 19996.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureEducationSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1855.
 
Location. 32° 55.368′ N, 97° 40.946′ W. Marker is in Springtown, Texas, in Parker County. Marker is on Old Springtown Road south of Sandlin Lane, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7903 Old Springtown Road, Springtown TX 76082, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Veal's Station Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Springtown Cemetery (approx. 2.7 miles away); Hill Family in Springtown (approx. 2.7 miles away); Springtown Tabernacle on the Square (approx. 2.9 miles away); City of Springtown
William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J Frye Fort Worth TX, February 18, 2022
2. William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead Marker
(approx. 3 miles away); Eureka Lodge No. 371, A.F. & A.M. (approx. 3 miles away); Dr. George and Ruth Jones House (approx. 3.1 miles away); Jay Bird - Union Grove School, Church, and Cemetery (approx. 4.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Springtown.
 
William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J Frye Fort Worth TX, February 18, 2022
3. William and Elisabeth Woody Homestead Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 24, 2022. It was originally submitted on February 24, 2022, by J Frye of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 720 times since then and 259 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 24, 2022, by J Frye of Fort Worth, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 24, 2024